The Best Prime Rib You’ll Ever Make

This Best Prime Rib Recipe is a meltingly tender show stopper with a pepper, garlic-herb studded crust dripping with so much flavor you will be obsessed.  This no-fail recipe with step-by-step photos, tips, tricks and video works with any size standing rib roast, and is guaranteed to be the juiciest you ever tasted thanks to dry brining (resting with salt), pads of butter, and cooking lower and slower. This easy prime rib roast can be prepped ahead of time for stress free entertaining (instructions included) that will have your guests swooning!

Watch How to cook Prime Rib

best prime rib recipe showing the golden, crispy pepper crust


 

This is the Best Prime Rib Recipe

  • HOW TO GUIDE.  Everything you need to know to achieve the best prime rib is included in this post – even if you’ve never cooked one before!  
  • EASY NO FAIL RECIPE.  Impressive doesn’t have to be difficult!  Most of the time is hand’s off brining or slow cooking.  You are 100% guaranteed the best prime rib by following the recipe and using a meat thermometer. 
  • DRY BRINING. This game changer dries out the the surface of the meat promoting a spectacular seared crust, deeply seasons the meat and creates the juiciest beef you ever sunk your teeth into.
  • OVEN SEAR. Blasting the prime rib roast with high heat for 20 minutes seals in the juices and creates the coveted crisp, browned crust.
  • BUTTER!  Cubes of butter are added after searing so it doesn’t burn or melt the peppercorn crust away.  It then seeps into the meat and is basted all over the finished prime rib for extreme juiciness.
  • COOKING LOWER AND SLOWER.  Cooking the standing rib roast at 250 degrees F instead of 325 allows more time for the fat to melt and the meat to cook evenly, creating a blushing pink color all the way from edge to center without a thick overcooked rim.
  • FLAVORFUL DRIPPINGS.  The prime rib roast is cooked on a bed of onion, garlic and herbs for even cooking, a burn-free bottom and superior flavored roast and drippings for basting and/or au jus.
  • SPLURGE WORTHY.  This perfect prime rib boasts superior melt-in-your-mouth texture, juiciness and flavor above all other cuts of beef, making it a show stopping investment that’s still less expensive than dining out.
front view of prime rib recipe (standing rib roast) cooked with the bones in
ingredient icon

Ingredients for the Perfect Prime Rib

This prime rib recipe is made with relatively few ingredients, so it’s important to pick the best! Let’s take a closer look at what you’ll need (full measurements in the printable recipe card at the bottom of the post):

Purchasing prime rib: 

  • Purchase from a butcher: Purchase from a butcher shop or the butcher counter at your grocery store. Tell the butcher what you’re looking for and they can provide guidance and custom butchering services.
  • Select bone-in prime rib: Bone in prime rib, also known as a “Standing Rib Roast,” is taken from the back of the upper ribs of the cow. A full rack of prime beef is 7 ribs and can be cut to size depending on how many pounds you would like to purchase. Ask the butcher to remove the ribs and tie them to the roast. He will know exactly what you mean. This way, the prime rib still “cooks” with the bones, but can be removed in seconds for effortless carving.  
  • Grade of Meat: Choose a high-grade piece of beef. USDA Prime is the top grade and is known for its superior marbling, tenderness, and flavor. USDA Choice is also a good option, offering quality but with slightly less marbling than Prime. Pro Tip: Many grocery stores only carry choice cuts, so you may need to order a prime cut from your butcher. This is what I did and it came in 2 days later.
  • Marbling: Marbling refers to the intramuscular fat within the meat. Look for prime rib with abundant marbling which enhances tenderness and flavor during cooking.
  • Color: The meat should be bright in red color. Avoid meat that appears brownish, as it may indicate oxidation or aging.
  • Fat Cap: A thin layer of fat, known as the fat cap, is desirable as it adds flavor and moisture during cooking.
  • Consistent Thickness: Choose a prime rib with a consistent thickness throughout. This ensures even cooking and doneness.
showing how to select a prime rib with rich marbling and bright color

Prime Rib Seasoning

  • Kosher Salt: This is a must because its large texture doesn’t clump like table salt. It seasons the meat, tenderizes the meat by dry brining and creates a beautifully crispy seared crust by drying out the exterior.
  • Multi-color peppercorns: Often referred to as peppercorn blend, is a mixture of black, white, green, and sometimes pink or red peppercorns. Each type of peppercorn contributes a unique flavor profile and aroma to the blend creating a more complex and nuanced flavor than all black. The blend offers a balance of heat, pungency, and subtle fruity or earthy notes. You should be able to find a peppercorn blend with the other spices at your grocery store, or on AMAZON HERE.
  • Garlic: You’ll need ¼ cup freshly minced garlic, about 9 cloves. Do NOT use a garlic press, instead, mince by hand, otherwise the garlic will burn.
  • Fresh rosemary: The rosemary in this recipe is subtle and not overpowering. It offers hints of piney, peppery, lemony, woodsy, and notes of citrus, lavender, sage, and mint to compliment the rich meat. Use just the leaves and not the woody stem, measure after mincing.
  • Dried thyme: The thyme is also subtle with minty earthiness, wood, and floral notes. Use just the leaves, measure after mincing.
  • Onion powder: Just ½ teaspoon adds subtle aromatic flavor.
  • Paprika: Use regular/traditional paprika and not smoked for its rich, mild, sweet flavor.
  • Ground coriander: This is mild, slightly sweet with hints of citrus to brighten the rub. If you don’t stock it, it’s okay to skip.
  • Ground mustard: The combination of pungency, heat and tanginess add depth and complexity to the spice rub.
  • Olive oil: Use an extra light olive oil with a high smoke point so your oven is less likely to get smoky. However, it’s fine to use whatever you have on hand, just expect more smoke when you open the oven after searing. The olive oil moistens the meat and helps the spices permeate the prime rib.
best prime rib sliced on a cutting board showing how juicy it is

How to Cook Prime Rib

Cooking the best prime rib is easier than you think. There are a few steps, but each is easy! As mentioned, the key is to use a digital probe thermometer to cook it perfectly every time. Let’s take a closer look with step-by-step photos (full recipe in the recipe card at the bottom of the post):

  • Step 1 Dry Brine Prime Rib. Pat the meat dry with paper towels, then sprinkle evenly with 2 tablespoons kosher salt. Pat the salt into the meat. Refrigerate for as long as you have time for, up to 48. Even 6 hours is hugely beneficial.
showing how to cook prime rib by adding kosher salt to dry brine
  • Step 2: Bring to Room Temperature. For a 10 pound prime rib, let sit at room temperature for 4-5 hours. For a smaller prime rib, let sit at room temperature for 3 hours. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 500˚F with rack in the lower third of the oven, so the prime rib will be in the center. The salt will reabsorb into the prime rib while it sits.
showing how to cook prime rib by letting it come to room temperature
  • Step 3: Create a Roasting Bed: Place the quartered onion, halved garlic, rosemary and thyme in the bottom of a roasting pan (preferably nonstick for easy cleanup (like this one).
showing how to cook prime rib by adding onions, garlic, rosemary and thyme to a roasting pan
  • Step 4: Make Garlic Herb Pepper Spice Rub. Add the peppercorns to a plastic bag, then use a rolling pin to crush them completely. Transfer to a medium bowl and stir in finely chopped garlic, minced rosemary, minced thyme, paprika, onion powder, ground coriander and ground mustard
showing how to cook prime rib by crushing peppercorns with a rolling pin, then adding to a bowl with garlic, rosemary, thyme and spices
  • Step 5: Season Prime Rib. Lightly pat the room temperature prime rib with paper towels. Rub the top and sides all over with the spice rub.
showing how to cook prime rib by rubbing peppercorn rub all over the prime rib
  • Step 6: Add Thermometer. Transfer the prime rib to the roasting bed in the roasting pan, bone-side-down, fat side up. Insert a digital probe meat thermometer into the center thickest portion of the meat. This thermometer is my favorite (pictured a section below and in the video) and only $25 on Amazon.
showing how to cook prime rib by placing prime rib in roasting pan and inserting a probe meat thermometer
  • Step 7: Oven Sear. Bake at 500˚F for  20 minutes.
showing how to cook prime rib by searing in the oven for 20 minutes
  • Step 8: Add Butter and Bake. After searing, remove prime rib from the oven. Dot with butter and return to the oven to roast at 250 degrees F until medium-rare.
showing how to cook prime rib by adding cubed butter to the prime rib, then roasting
  • Step 9: Baste and Rest: Thoroughly baste with the juices from the bottom of the pan. Transfer prime rib to a cutting board. Cover loosely with foil and rest for 20 minutes, or until the internal temperature rises to desired doneness (129°F for medium rare).     
showing how to cook prime rib by basting with pan juices after roasting
showing how to cut prime rib recipe across the grain into 1/2-inch slices

Perfect Prime Rib Temperature Chart

The biggest mistake people make cooking prime rib is not factoring in carryover, meaning, the beef will continue to cook once it’s pulled out of the oven. The trick is to remove the prime rib roast before it reaches your desired temperature. This may sound complicated, but don’t worry, I’ve factored in the carryover in the chart below and exactly what temperature you should remove the roast from the oven:

DonenessPull TemperatureTarget Temp
After Resting
Rare118°F / 48°C124°F/51°C
Medium rare (recommended)122°F / 50°C 129°F /54°C
Medium (NOT recommended)127°F / 53°C135°F / 57°C
Medium well done (NOT recommended)131°F / 55°C138°F / 59°C
Well done (NOT recommended)CRIMINAL!N/A
  • Pull Temperature: This is the internal temperature of the meat when you should remove it from the oven to reach your desired Target Temperature. It is lower then the Target Temperature because it factors in carryover/the increase in meat temperature after resting.
  • Target Temperature After Resting: This is the internal temperature the meat will reach after resting. Never cook to Target Temperature in the oven or the meat will over cook after resting.

Helpful tips for How to Cook a Prime Rib Perfectly

Cooking a perfect prime rib is easier than you think! Follow these helpful tips to ensure the best prime rib recipe every time:

  • Scale Up or Down: This recipe can be scaled down to any size roast by using the sliding scale that pops up when you hover over the servings in the recipe card.
  • Selecting the Right Cut: Choose a high-quality bone-in prime rib roast with good marbling for optimal flavor and tenderness. Go for prime cut if you can afford it. You’ll likely need to order it from your butcher ahead of time.
  • Don’t Skip Dry Brining: Dry brine the prime rib for as long as you have time for from 3 hours to 48 hours. DO NOT add the salt just before cooking or it will pull the moisture from the meat onto the surface without having time to reabsorb back into the meat.
  • Pay Attention to the Brand of Kosher saltMorton’s brand has compact, denser crystals, so you will need 2 tablespoons.  Diamond Crystal has lighter, looser crystals, so you will need 3 ½ tablespoons.
  • Pat the Salt: Use the palm of your hand or fingers to pat in the salt. Avoid rubbing because this causes clumps, and unevenly seasons areas.
  • Bring to Room Temperature: Take the prime rib out of the refrigerator at least 4 hours before cooking to allow it to come to room temperature. This ensures more even cooking so you don’t end up with a thick layer of overcooked beef on the outside and a small circle of pink perfect cooked beef in the middle.
  • Use a Probe Meat Thermometer: Use a digital probe thermometer (this is my fav), that stays in the meat while it cooks, so you always know the exact temperature and aren’t continually opening the oven.
  • Cook to Medium Rare: This creates the juiciest, most tender prime rib.
  • Remember carryover: When gauging the temperature of the meat to remove it from the oven, don’t forget to allow for carryover, otherwise, it will overcook while resting! Remove the prime rib before the target internal temperature because the meat continues to cook an addition 5-7 degrees as it rests.
  • Calculate Cooking Time: Estimate the cooking time based on the weight of the prime rib roast and your desired doneness. A general guideline is 12-15 minutes per pound for medium-rare, but it can vary.
  • Resting Period: Allow the cooked roast to rest for at least 20 minutes before carving. This helps redistribute the juices, resulting in a juicier and more flavorful standing rib roast.
showing what perfect prime rib cooked to medium-rare looks like

How to serve the Best Prime Rib

Prime rib is often served with a flavorful sauce or au jus to enhance its natural juices and add an extra layer of richness. Here are some common sauces that pair well with standing rib roast:

  • Horseradish Sauce: The sharp and zesty flavor of horseradish complements the richness of meat. Use my super easy 5 minute horseradish sauce that’s make ahead friendly, pantry friendly and keeps for up to a week!
  • Au Jus: A classic choice, au jus is a simple and light beef-based sauce made from the drippings of the roasted prime rib. It’s typically seasoned with salt and pepper and may be served on the side for dipping. To make au jus, transfer the pan juices and aromatics to a skillet. Add 2 cups reduced sodium beef broth and bring to a simmer. Mix 1 tablespoon cornstarch with 2 tablespoons water to make a slurry. Drizzle in half of the slurry to the beef broth and simmer for 1 minute. Add additional slurry if you would like it thicker. Strain to remove the onions and garlic.
  • Red Wine Reduction: This sauce adds depth and complexity to the meal. To make, transfer the pan juices and aromatics to a skillet. Add 2 ½ cups red wine and 1 ½ cups reduced sodium beef broth. Rapidly simmer for 10 minutes, or until reduced to 1 ½ cups. Reduce heat to medium. Mix 1 tablespoon cornstarch with 2 tablespoons water to make a slurry. Drizzle in half of the slurry and simmer for 1 minute. Add additional slurry if you would like it thicker. Strain to remove the onions and garlic.
  • Béarnaise Sauce: This is a buttery and flavorful sauce made with clarified butter, egg yolks, white wine vinegar, and herbs like tarragon. Its velvety texture pairs well with the tenderness of prime rib.
  • Mustard Sauce: A tangy mustard sauce, whether Dijon or whole grain, can provide a sharp contrast to the richness of the meat.
  • Chimichurri: For a fresh and herbaceous option, consider serving the standing rib roast with chimichurri, a vibrant Argentine sauce made with parsley, garlic, vinegar, and olive oil.
  • Garlic-Herb Butter: A simple garlic-herb butter, melted over the sliced prime rib, can enhance the flavors and add a luxurious touch. Use the herb butter from this Beef Tenderloin recipe.
up close of slices of prime rib recipe showing the  pepper crust

Sides for prime rib

Nothing is better with this prime rib recipe than Garlic Butter Mashed Potatoes! Of course, we’ll throw in a fantastic salad like Apple Salad and a veggie like Parmesan Asparagus and now you have a meal worthy of your spectacular roast! Feel free to mix and match some of the tasty options below:

How to Cook a Prime Rib FAQs

What is Prime Rib?


Prime rib, also called “standing rib roast” is considered the “crème de la crème” of beef, highly regarded for its rich marbling, tenderness, and succulent flavor. It is a cut of beef that comes from the primal rib section of the cow, typically from ribs 6 through 12. The outer layer of fat and the rib bones contribute to the meat’s richness and juiciness during cooking. Prime rib roast is an investment cut of beef, often reserved for special occasions or holiday feasts.

What cut of meat is prime rib?


Prime rib is a cut of beef that comes from the primal rib section of the cow. It is also known as a standing rib roast because it is often roasted with the ribs left on, which gives it a distinctive and impressive appearance. The specific ribs included in prime rib typically range from ribs 6 through 12. This cut is renowned for its marbling, tenderness, and rich flavor, making it a popular choice for special occasions and holiday feasts.

What is so special about prime rib?

Prime rib is considered special for several reasons:

1. Marbling and Flavor: It is well-marbled with fat, which contributes to its tenderness, juiciness, rich and succulent flavor.
2 Tenderness: The rib section of the cow, from which prime rib is cut, is known for tenderness.
3. Presentation: Prime rib is often prepared as a standing rib roast which not only adds visual appeal to the roast but also imparts additional flavor during cooking.
4. Special Occasion Dish: Due to its premium qualities, prime rib is frequently reserved for special occasions, celebrations, and holiday feasts. Its association with festive gatherings makes it a symbol of indulgence and luxury.
5. Celebrated Flavor: The natural flavor of prime rib is often celebrated with minimal seasoning to allow the quality of the meat to shine. However, it also provides a canvas for creative rubs, herbs, and spices.

Prime Rib vs. Ribeye?


Prime rib and ribeye are both cuts of beef that come from the rib section of the cow, but they have distinct characteristics and are typically prepared and served in different ways.

Prime Rib:
1. Cut: Prime rib is a large roast cut from the primal rib section, often bone-in and including several ribs.
2. Cooking: It is usually roasted whole, with the ribs attached, making it a show-stopping centerpiece for special occasions.
3. Presentation: Slices of prime rib are often served with the bone and a layer of fat, providing richness and flavor.

Ribeye:
1. Cut: Ribeye is a steak cut from the rib section, specifically from the eye of the prime rib roast.
2. Cooking: Ribeye steaks are typically grilled, pan-seared, or cooked using dry heat methods.
3. Presentation: It is a boneless steak with a well-marbled texture, offering a good balance of tenderness and flavor.

Key Differences:
1. Bone: Prime rib often includes the bone, while ribeye is a boneless steak.
2. Cooking Method: Prime rib is commonly roasted, and ribeye is often grilled or seared.
3. Portion Size: Prime rib is a larger cut suitable for serving a group, while ribeye steaks are individual portions.

In summary, prime rib is a roast, and ribeye is a steak cut from the same rib section. Prime rib is often associated with special occasions and festive meals due to its size and presentation, while ribeye steaks offer a more individualized and versatile dining experience.

What to do with leftover prime rib


Leftover prime rib can be repurposed into delicious meals. Use it anyplace you would use steak, ground beef, or even chicken! Here are some ideas for what to do with leftover prime rib:

1. Prime Rib Sandwich: Slice the leftover prime rib thinly and make a hearty sandwich. Add your favorite condiments, cheese, and veggies for a satisfying meal.
2. Prime Rib Hash: Chop the leftover prime rib into small pieces and use it in a breakfast hash. Sauté with potatoes, onions, and bell peppers, and top with a fried egg.
3. Prime Rib Tacos or Quesadillas: Shred the leftover prime rib and use it as a filling for tacos or quesadillas. Add cheese, salsa, and your favorite toppings for a quick and flavorful meal.
4. Beef and Vegetable Soup: Use the prime rib bones to make a rich broth, then add the leftover meat along with vegetables to create a hearty beef and vegetable soup.
5. Prime Rib Fried Rice: Chop the leftover prime rib into small pieces and stir-fry with cooked rice, vegetables, and soy sauce for a tasty prime rib fried rice.
6. Beef Stroganoff: Slice the prime rib into thin strips and use it in a classic beef stroganoff. Serve over egg noodles or rice for a comforting dish.
7. Prime Rib Salad: Slice the leftover prime rib thinly and serve it over a bed of mixed greens with your favorite salad toppings. Drizzle with a vinaigrette for a lighter option.
8. Beef and Cheese Stuffed Baked Potatoes: Scoop out baked potatoes, mix the flesh with chopped prime rib, cheese, and other desired toppings, then stuff the mixture back into the potato skins and bake until golden.
9. Prime Rib Pizza: Use leftover prime rib as a pizza topping. Combine with cheese, onions, mushrooms, or other favorite pizza ingredients for a unique and flavorful pizza.
10. Prime Rib Frittata: Whisk eggs, add chopped prime rib, vegetables, and cheese, then bake for a delicious prime rib frittata, perfect for breakfast or brunch.

What temperature do you cook prime rib?

First, sear the prime rib in the oven at 500 degrees F to create a deeply flavorful caramelized crust that seals in the juices. Next, reduce the temperature to 250°F and cook low and slow. This lower oven temperature allows for more even cooking (without a thick, overcooked outer ring), allowing the fat to melt and baste the meat as it cooks, achieving a beautiful
blushing pink all the way through.

Do you cook prime rib at 250 or 350?

It’s best to cook prime rib at 250°F for more even cooking and increased juiciness. This method allows for a gradual breakdown of connective tissues, resulting in a more tender and flavorful outcome. The extended cooking time at a lower temperature reduces the risk of overcooking the outer layers, and provides a larger window to achieve the desired internal temperature.

showing how to serve prime rib with horseradish sauce

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The Perfect Prime Rib

This Best Prime Rib Recipe is a meltingly tender show stopper with a pepper, garlic-herb studded crust dripping with so much flavor you will be obsessed.  This no-fail recipe works with any size standing rib roast (see notes), and is guaranteed to be the juiciest you ever tasted thanks to dry brining (resting with salt), pads of butter, and cooking lower and slower. This easy recipe can be prepped ahead of time for stress free entertaining that will have your guests swooning!
Servings: 10 -14 servings
Total Time: 1 day 2 hours 20 minutes
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours

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Ingredients

Prime Rib

  • 1 10 pound roast-ready prime rib roast (ribs cut off and tied to roast)***
  • 2 tablespoons Morton's kosher salt (3 ½ Tablespoons for Diamond brand)
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, chopped into 9 pieces

Garlic Herb Pepper Spice Rub

  • 1/4 cup multicolor whole peppercorns (peppercorn blend)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons minced rosemary leaves (measure after mincing)
  • 1 teaspoon minced thyme leaves (measure after mincing)
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped garlic (DO NOT use a garlic press)
  • 1 tsp EACH onion powder, paprika
  • 1/2 tsp EACH ground coriander, ground mustard

ROASTING BED

  • 1 yellow onion unpeeled, quartered
  • 1 head garlic, unpeeled, sliced through the equator
  • 5 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 3 sprigs fresh rosemary

For Serving (Optional)

Instructions

  • Dry Brine Prime Rib: Pat the meat dry with paper towels. Sprinkle evenly with kosher salt on all sides. Pat the salt into the meat. Tent with foil and refrigerate for as long as you have time for, up to 48 hours. Even a few hours is better than nothing! If you don’t have time, salt the meat, then let it dry brine as it comes to room temperature (next step).
  • Bring to Room Temperature: For a 10-pound prime rib roast, let it sit at room temperature for 4-5 hours. For a smaller prime rib, let it sit at room temperature for 3 hours. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 500˚F with rack in the lower third of the oven, so the prime rib will be in the center.
  • Create Roasting Bed: Place the quartered onion, halved garlic, rosemary and thyme in the bottom of a roasting pan (preferably nonstick for easy cleanup (like this one).
  • Make Garlic Herb Pepper Spice Rub: Add the peppercorns to a plastic bag, then use a rolling pin to crush them completely. Transfer to a medium bowl and add the rest of the Spice Rub ingredients. Stir to evenly combine.
  • Season Prime Rib: When ready to roast, lightly pat the room temperature prime rib with paper towels. Rub all over with the Spice Rub.
  • Add Thermometer: Transfer the prime rib to the roasting bed in the roasting pan, bone-side-down, fat side up. Insert a digital probe meat thermometer (A MUST) into the center thickest portion of the meat. This thermometer is my favorite (seen in the video) and only $25 on Amazon.
  • Oven Sear: Bake, uncovered, at 500˚F for 20 minutes.
  • Add Butter: After searing, remove the prime rib from the oven. Reduce oven temperature to 250˚ F. Dot the roast with cubed butter down the center.
  • Slow Roast: Return prime rib to the oven to roast, uncovered, at 250˚ F, until the thermometer reaches 122° F (this will be medium-rare and will rise to 129°F after carryover). See Temperature Chart in Notes. This should take approximately 15 minutes per pound, but DO NOT rely on this approximation – you MUST USE a digital probe thermometer or you will RUIN your roast!
  • Baste and Rest: Remove the medium-rare prime rib from the oven. Thoroughly baste the roast with the juices from the bottom of the pan. Transfer prime rib to a cutting board. Cover loosely with foil and rest for 20 minutes, or until the internal temperature rises to desired doneness (129°F for medium rare).
  • Carve: Cut the string, unwrap the roast and remove the bones. Place the prime rib flat on a cutting board. Using a sharp carving knife, carve the meat into slices of desired thickness, typically about 1/2-inch thick.
  • Serve: I recommend serving with this 5 Minute Horseradish Sauce <<<Click for recipe, or see post for other options such as au jus and red wine sauce.

Video

Notes

  • Scale Up or Down: This recipe can be scaled down to any size roast by using the sliding scale that pops up when you hover over the servings in the recipe card. (Note, this will not change the amount of Diamond Kosher Salt in parentheticals, so calculate or stick with Morton’s brand). 
  • ***Purchasing prime rib: Purchase from a butcher shop or the butcher counter at your grocery store. A full rack of prime beef is 7 ribs and can be cut to size depending on how many pounds you would like to purchase. Ask the butcher to remove the ribs and tie them to the roast. He will know exactly what you mean. This way, the prime rib still “cooks” with the bones, but can be removed in seconds for effortless carving.  
  • Grade of Meat: Choose a high-grade piece of beef. USDA Prime is the top grade and is known for its superior marbling, tenderness, and flavor. USDA Choice is also a good option, offering quality but with slightly less marbling than Prime. Pro Tip: Many grocery stores only carry choice cuts, so you may need to order a prime cut from your butcher. This is what I did and it came in 2 days later.
  • Digital probe thermometer MUST:  You need a probe meat thermometer that stays in the meat while it cooks, otherwise, you are opening and closing the door to check the temperature which disrupts even cooking. Also, it’s difficult cook the prime rib perfectly.  I recommend this digital probe thermometer as seen in the photos and video. Only $25 on Amazon.
  • Multi-color peppercorns: Each type of peppercorn contributes a unique flavor profile and aroma to the blend creating a more complex and nuanced flavor than all black. You should be able to find with the spices at your grocery store, or on AMAZON HERE.  

Temperature Chart

  • Pull Temperature: This is the internal temperature of the meat when you should remove it from the oven to reach your desired Target Temperature. It is lower then the Target Temperature because it factors in carryover/the increase in meat temperature after resting.
  • Target Temperature After Resting: This is the internal temperature the meat will reach after resting. Never cook to Target Temperature in the oven or the meat will over cook after resting.
Doneness Pull Temperature Target Temp
After Resting
Rare 118°F / 48°C 124°F/51°C
Medium rare (recommended) 122°F / 50°C 129°F /54°C
Medium (NOT recommended) 127°F / 53°C 135°F / 57°C
Medium well done (NOT recommended) 131°F / 55°C 138°F / 59°C
Well done (NOT recommended) CRIMINAL! N/A
 
  • Prep ahead: The prime rib can be dried and salted up to 48 hours ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator. The pepper spice rub can be whisked together and refrigerated up to 24 hours ahead of time. 
  • Storage: Cool to room temperature before wrapping tightly in plastic wrap, aluminum foil, or placing in an airtight container. Refrigerate for 3 to 4 days.  For longer storage, freeze the prime rib for up to 3 months. Double wrap the roast tightly in plastic wrap, followed by foil to prevent freezer burn. When ready to use, thaw in the refrigerator a day before, then reheat per any of the below methods.
 

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