Kalua Pork

Succulent, juicy, melt-in-your-mouth tender Kalua Pork (Kalua Pig) is the famous luau style pork that’s big on flavor but low on effort! It’s easy to make at home in the slow cooker, pressure cooker or oven!

This Kalua Pork is ridiculously juicy, tender, smoky and salty but SO simple to make with just a few ingredients and minutes of prep.  This foolproof recipe is made by rubbing the pork with Hawaiian sea salt and spices, searing, drizzling with liquid smoke then letting the slow cooker, oven or instant pot do the rest of the work.  This Kalua Pork recipe is ideal for an easy prep-ahead dinner, stress-free entertaining or freezer meal that leaves you with melt-in-your-mouth pork and hardly any cleanup! Serve the succulent, spoon tender Kalua Pork plain with a side of coconut rice and pina colada fruit salad or it’s delish in sandwiches, burritos, salads, tacos and more!  

Pork recipes from slow roasted to quick skillet dinners are some of my favorites! Don’t miss lechon asado (Mojo marinated pork), pork carnitas, garlic butter pork tenderloin, grilled pork tenderloin, brown sugar pork chops, BBQ pulled pork and the best pork chop marinade.

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How to make Kalua pork video

up close of a bowl of kalua pork garnished by green onions showing how tender and juicy it is

WHAT IS KALUA PORK?

When vacationing in Maui this summer, we had the privilege of sinking our teeth into rich, earthy, juicy shredded Kalua Pork permeated with smokiness, and I was amazed at how unbelievably delicious the simple pork was – and how I couldn’t stop eating it!  So, what exactly is this famous Hawaiian pork?

Authentic Kalua Pig (Pork) is salt-rubbed smoked whole pig, a popular Hawaiian dish and the centerpiece of nearly every Hawaiian luau. It is named after its cooking technique, Kālua meaning “cooked in an underground oven,” in native Hawaiian. 

Since it is nearly impossible to replicate this cooking technique on the mainland, Kalua Pork has also come to mean Kalua-style pork shoulder rubbed with Hawaiian salt, rock or pink salt and liquid smoke then cooked in the slow cooker until fall apart tender with surprisingly similar, drool-worthy results to the real thing.

How is Kalua Pork traditionally made?

To make authentic Kalua Pork, an underground pit called an “imu,” is dug 2-4 feet deep then filled with koa wood and lava rock.  The pit is set on fire and left to heat for several hours until kindling turns to coal.  Next, a whole pig is rubbed with Hawaiian salt and the cavity is filled with blazing hot stones.  The pig is lowered into the smoky imu, covered with banana leaves, coconut palm fronds or ti leaves (palm-like leaves) and soil and left to smoke for hours until tender.  

The pork emerges salty and smoky with earthy undertones from the banana leaves and soil.   When the pork is finished cooking, it is removed from the pit in a celebratory imu ceremony then taken to the kitchen for shredding.  

Kalua Pork Recipe

Can you still make Kalua Pig if you don’t have an imu in your backyard?  Yes!  You can make this Hawaiian delicacy in the slow cooker, oven or instant pot thanks to liquid smoke which mimics the flavor of natural smoke. The slow cooked pork emerges smoky, salty and mouth-wateringly juicy. The pork is so delicious that both Patrick and I were actually shocked at just how incredible it was; we craved the Kalua Pork, needed the Kalua pork, dreamt about the Kalua Pork (is that weird?). 

Here’s what makes this Kalua Pork recipe so fabulous and the reason I am giddy to share it with you today:  

Why this Kalua Pig recipe works…

  • FLAVORFUL:  the pork is spice rubbed with salt, ginger, garlic powder and pepper.  The ginger, garlic powder and pepper are not traditional so take them or leave them, but they add subtle complexity without overwhelming the dish. The pork is then seared to reap the caramelizing benefits of the Maillard reaction and finally enveloped in liquid smoke, the secret weapon which permeates the pork with smokiness and mimics the natural smokiness of the imu. 
  • RICH, JUICY, & TENDER.  The pork is cooked low and slow to yield succulent, fall-apart tender pulled pork shoulder that’s shredded then left to braise for 20 additional minutes to soak up the flavorful juices. 
  • EASY TO MAKE. This Kalua Pig is a mostly hands-off recipe with less than 10 minutes of prep and then the slow cooker or oven does the rest!
  • VERSATILE. Shredded Kalua Pork can be enjoyed so many different ways from serving it with traditional rice and cabbage, to pulled pork sandwiches, tacos, burritos, salads, nachos, and so much more.
  • PERFECT FOR EVERY OCCASSION.  Whether you want an easy dinner or a crowd-pleasing company feast, Kalua Pig is the answer. It’s prep-ahead friendly, simple without any fussy fixings and perfect for buffet style eating.  
  • EASY TO DOUBLE.  If you are hosting a large crowd, grab an extra slow cooker are instant pot from a friend and double the recipe.  Now you have the easiest yet tastiest backyard luau without any stress!
  • FREEZER FRIENDLY.  Kalua Pig is the recipe that keeps on giving.  If you don’t devour all of the pork, it freezes great for later.
top view of picking up Kalua pork recipe with tongs

WHAT cut of pork should I use?

This Kalua Pork recipe can be made with either a pork shoulder or pork (Boston) butt.  Despite the names, both pork butt and pork shoulder both come from the shoulder of the pig. Pork shoulder comes from the shoulder area just above the forelegs and Boston butt comes from the area stacked vertically above that, around the shoulder blades.

If you have a choice between Boston pork butt and pork shoulder, always choose pork butt. It is named after the barrels (butts) pork used to be stored in around the time of the Revolutionary War. Pork butt is fattier and has more marbling throughout the meat so it emerges more flavorful and tender.

Whether you choose pork shoulder or butt, look for a roast with a good amount of marbling, which will transform into succulent, and richly flavored pulled pork. 

FAT CAP ON OR OFF?

Boston butts have a fat cap, a layer of hard white fat that sits on top of the meat, sometimes as much has an inch thick.  I recommend trimming all of it except 1/8-inch.  The thin layer of remaining fat will create a self-basting effect as it breaks down and drips over the meat, resulting in extra juicy and extra flavorful pork, with little surface fat remaining after roasting. 

Key Ingredients in this Kalua Pork Recipe:

In addition to pork shoulder or pork butt, you will need:  

  • Hawaiian sea salt: is an unrefined sea salt that has been mixed with an iron oxide rich volcanic clay called ʻalaea, which gives the salt its characteristic brick red color.  The salt is richer in minerals than conventional salt and the clay imparts a subtle earthy flavor. I use this ‘Alaea Salt for this recipe which you can purchase on Amazon.  Places like Whole Foods, Sprouts and World Market sometimes carry Hawaiian sea salt as well.
  • Liquid smoke: if you aren’t familiar with liquid smoke, it really is liquid smoke! It mimics the smokiness of the imu without having to actually dig a pit and smoke the pork.  Liquid smoke is created by capturing smoke as it rises through a combustion chamber filled with wood chips to a condenser.  In the condenser, the smoke cools and forms a liquid, thus liquid smoke.  (thank you Wikipedia).  It is a very common ingredient and should be easy to find next to the barbecue sauces in your grocery store.  You can use mesquite liquid smoke if you already have it, but I find hickory to be the best in this recipe.  
  • Seasonings:  the Kalua Pig is seasoned with garlic powder, ginger powder and pepper.  These seasonings are not traditional so you don’t have to use them, but I think they make for the best Kalua Pork recipe.  They add subtle complexity of flavor while still allowing the salt and the smokiness to shine.

Can I use regular sea salt?  Himalayan sea salt?

Hawaiian salt imparts a subtle earthy flavor but you my substitute with coarse sea salt or coarsely ground Himalayan pink sea salt instead.  Pink Himalayan sea salt is the best substitute because it has a higher mineral content (hence the pink color), just like Hawaiian sea salts.  Just don’t use kosher salt or table salt because the grains are much finer and will make your pork too salty! 

top view of a plate of Kalua Pork recipe with rice, pineapple and macaroni salad

Possible Recipe variations

  • Add banana leaves.  Wrap the pork in banana leaves after you sear it and leave it to braise.  The banana leaves will infuse it with a rich, earthy flavor. You can find banana leaves sold in the freezer section of most Asian markets. Banana leaves are pretty large, so cut them down into a few smaller pieces.  Wrap the pork layer by layer in the banana leaves and don’t be alarmed if a few of them split, just do your best to encase the pork.
  • Omit the seasonings.  You can go more traditional and omit the garlic powder, ginger powder and pepper.

How to make Kalua Pork

Kalua Pork is the epitome of a minimal prep and maximum flavor recipe!  Once you’ve gathered the ingredients, it’s a quick season, sear and cook until fall-apart tender. Here’s how:

Step 1 Season the pork.  Pat the pork dry with paper towels so the seasonings will stick and the pork will sear and not just steam.  Whisk the seasonings together and evenly rub them over all sides of the pork.

showing how to make Kalua Pork (Kalua Pig) recipe by seasoning the pork with Hawaiian sea salt

Step 2:  Sear the pork.  This extra step is well worth it.  It caramelizes the outside of the pork for a depth of flavor and increases its moisture capacity so its’s extra juicy.  The pork is large so it can be a bit awkward to sear, but do your best to rotate it with forks or tongs to sear all sides until browned.

showing how to make Kalua Pork (Kalua Pig) recipe by searing the pork in a cast iron skillet

Step 3:  Add liquid smoke.  Transfer pork the prepared slow cooker.  Brush the liquid smoke over the seared pork.

showing how to make Kalua Pork (Kalua Pig) recipe by brushing the pork with liquid smoke

Step 4:  Cook.  Cover on LOW for 8 to 12 hours until pork is fall apart tender and easily shreds with a fork. Make sure to check the pork at the early part of the cooking window and continue to cook if needed.

showing how to make Kalua Pork (Kalua Pig) recipe by cooking the pork in the slow cooker

Can the pork be cooked on high heat?

I do not recommend high heat for this recipe.  Low heat is recommended for the most tender pork so the tough connective tissues have time to break down.  You may cook the pork on high heat if it is your only option.  

Step 5: Shred pork.  Once very tender, shred the pork and toss with the slow cooker juices.   Turn the slow cooker to low (if it had been on high), cover, and continue to cook for 20 minutes.

showing how to serve Kalua pork by picking it up with tongs in the slow cooker

Can I make kalua pig in a pressure cooker? 

Yes, Kalua Pig can be cooked in the pressure cooker but it is my least favorite method between braising in the oven, slow cooking and pressure cooking.  Pork shoulder and butt should be cooked low and slow so the marbling throughout the meat has plenty of time to break down to create juicy, tender pork. Instead, pressure cooking sacrifices some of the rich flavor and won’t be as tender but can be used if you’re short on time and you lower your expectations.  Full pressure cooker instructions in the recipe card at the bottom of the post.

Can I make Kalua Pork in the oven?

Yes, cooking Kalua Pork in the oven is my second favorite method behind the slow cooker.   Cook the pork roast at 325 degrees for about 6 hours or until very tender.  Full instructions in the recipe card.

how long do you cook kalua pork?

Kalua Pork should be cooked to an internal temperature of about 205 degrees F for shreddable tender.  This is far past the 145 degrees for safe consumption. The high internal temperature allows collagen to break down, making the meat melt in your mouth juicy.  This will take anywhere from 8-12 hours in a slow cooker.  In old slow cookers, it may even take up to 16 hours.  It will take about 6 hours in the oven and 90 minutes plus a slow release in the pressure cooker.

kalua pork RECIPE TIPS

  • You may use a Hawaiian salt substitute. You probably won’t find Hawaiian sea salt at the grocery store, but I have never had trouble finding pink Himalayan sea salt. 
  • Don’t skip searing the pork.  Searing the pork adds extra flavor and moisture that cannot be achieved any other way.  Sear all sides of the pork roast until deeply golden – no sorry grey color please!    
  • Use a cast iron skillet.  I recommend a large cast iron skillet because it gets piping hot and cooks more evenly.  When searing, the pork will naturally release from the pan once it’s properly seared. If it’s sticking to the bottom of the pan, it most likely needs more time. It will take 2-5 minutes per side (longer if using a nonstick pan).
  • Use a high smoking point oil. Use vegetable oil, avocado oil or sunflower oil to sear the pork– don’t substitute olive oil.  Olive oil has a lower smoking point and will not only smoke like crazy but can burn leaving behind a bitter taste and harmful chemicals.
  • Cook the pork until tender. If your pork isn’t crazy tender, then cook on!  It just means the proteins needs more time to break down and tenderize. Even 30 more minutes can make the world of difference between “okay” and melt-in-your-mouth Kalua Pig.
  • Soak after shredding.  Shredding the pork and cooking it for 20 minutes on Low in the juices is crucial. It allows the flavorful slow cooker juices to seep into every nook and cranny.
  • Don’t forget to season.  Taste the shredded pork before serving.  The pork should be borderline salty, if not, season with additional salt a little at a time.
  • Scale the ingredients.  You can purchase a smaller or larger pork shoulder/butt and adjust the ingredients in the recipe card by using the up and down arrows next to the servings. 
a bowl of Kalua pork recipe garnished with green onions

MAKE AHEAD TIPS FOR kalua pork

Kalua Pig is fabulous for making ahead or serving a crowd because most of the work is hands-off cooking.  To make ahead, cook the pork all the way through shredding.  Transfer the pork to the refrigerator directly in the ceramic crockpot insert or transfer the shredded pork in its juices to an airtight container in the refrigerator. 

The next day, warm the pork for 1-2 hours on low in the slow cooker or you can gently warm on the stove. Add a splash of water or broth if it seems dry.

WHAT SIDES DO I SERVE WITH kalua pork?

My favorite sides to serve with Kalua Pork are grilled pineapple, rice, and macaroni salad, but it is tasty with a myriad of options. Here are some more to choose from:

Sides for Kalua Pork

top view of easy Pina Colada Fruit Salad with pineapple, coconut, mandarin oranges, strawberries and blueberries in a white bowl
top view showing how to make Asian Ramen Noodle Salad by tossing the ingredients together with the dressing in a white bowl
Sweet and smoky Grilled Pineapple salsa with not only grilled pineapple but GRILLED red bell peppers, red onions AND jalapeno! sweet and smoky and possibly the best salsa E-V-E-R alone, with chips, tacos or on fish/chicken. #pineapple #salsa #pineapplesalsa #grill
Top Shot of Best BLT Pasta Salad in a white bowl with white tongs lifting the salad up
Top view of Creamy Pasta Salad with Peas and Bacon with a wood serving spoon
Asian Pineapple Salad with Coconut Peanut Dressing is a salad lover's dream! packed with refreshing pineapple and crunchy peanuts, peppers, carrots, jicama and coconut all doused with the most AMAZING silky Coconut Peanut Dressing that I could drink by itself!

FUN WAYS TO serve kalua pig

This Kalua Pig doesn’t just have to be served over rice!  Here are a few fun ideas to mix it up:

  • Kalua Pork and Cabbage: heat some Kalua Pork, finely shredded cabbage and a splash of soy sauce in a skillet and stir until the cabbage is wilted.  Serve over a pile of plain rice with an optional drizzle of spicy mayo over top.
  • Kalua Pork Sandwiches/Sliders:  my favorite way to serve the pork!  Line the bottom of a brioche bun or sweet Hawaiian roll with a slice of pineapple, top with Kalua Pork, a drizzle of Hawaiian Barbecue Sauce and pile with cabbage slaw.
  • Kalua Pork Tacos, Wraps or Lettuce Wraps: pile warm, shredded pork on top of a warm charred tortilla, flatbread or bib lettuce and top with a tropical salsa such mango salsa, or pineapple salsa along with optional black beans, guacamole or avocado crema. 
  • Kalua Pork Burrito Bowls:  pile rice with shredded pork, black beans, corn, cabbage, chopped pineapple or pineapple salsa etc. and your favorite creamy topping such as sour cream/Greek yogurt or I highly recommend either Tomatillo Avocado Ranch or Cilantro Lime Dressing.
  • Kalua Pork Burritos:  layer a burrito size tortilla with plain rice, coconut rice or pineapple rice, black beans, pork, guacamole, pineapple salsa and lettuce. 
  • Kalua Pork Salad: pick your favorite greens and load with shredded pork and your favorite veggies such as corn and peppers.  Throw in some cashews or macadamia nuts for crunch and pineapple for sweetness. You can drizzle with pineapple vinaigrette from this salad. 
  • Kalua Pork Quesadillas: sandwich pork, Monterrey Jack Cheese, black beans and cilantro in between two flour tortillas and toast in a skillet to golden, cheesy perfection. Serve with pineapple salsa or mango salsa, Hawaiian Barbecue Sauce and/or avocado crema.
  • Kalua Pork Nachos:  pile thick restaurant style tortilla chips with cheese and beans and bake.  Top with shredded pork, a drizzle of Hawaiian Barbecue Sauce and toppings such as jalapenos, pineapple salsa and guacamole.
  • Kalua Pork Taquitos: toss the shredded pork with Hawaiian Barbecue sauce and chopped pineapple, roll and bake until crispy.
  • Hawaiian Breakfast Plate:  serve Kalua Pig with rice and a couple fried eggs. 

HOW TO STORE AND REHEAT kaula pig

  • To store: store leftover Kalua Pig in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days with any leftover juices.  
  • To freeze:  let the pork cool completely then transfer to a freezer safe container or portion it into smaller containers.  Thaw in the refrigerator overnight before reheating.
  • To reheat in the microwave:  warm the pork in the microwave for 1 minute then at 20 second intervals until warmed through.
  • To reheat on the stove:  heat a drizzle of oil in a large pot and rewarm the pork gently over medium-low heat, adding a splash of broth or water if the pork seems a little dry.
  • To reheat in the slow cooker:  reheat in the slow cooker for 1-2 hours on low.
a plate of Kalua Pork recipe with rice, pineapple and macaroni salad

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a bowl of Kalua pork recipe garnished with green onions

Kalua Pork

This Kalua Pork is ridiculously juicy, tender, smoky and salty but SO simple to make with just a few ingredients and minutes of prep.  This foolproof recipe is made by rubbing the pork with Hawaiian sea salt and spices, searing, drizzling with liquid smoke then letting the slow cooker, oven or instant pot do the rest of the work.  This Kalua Pork recipe is ideal for an easy prep-ahead dinner, stress-free entertaining or freezer meal that leaves you with melt-in-your-mouth pork and hardly any cleanup! Serve the succulent, spoon tender Kalua Pork plain with a side of coconut rice and pina colada fruit salad or it’s delish in sandwiches, burritos, salads, tacos and more!
Servings: 12 servings
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 12 hours

Ingredients

  • 1 6 pound boneless pork shoulder or Boston butt roast, trimmed (see notes for different sizes)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 ½ tablespoons Hawaiian Sea Salt or Himalayan Sea Salt – NOT table or kosher salt!
  • 1 ½ tsp EACH ground ginger, garlic powder, pepper
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons liquid smoke (hickory or mesquite)

Instructions

  • Lightly spray the inside of a 6 quart or larger slow cooker with nonstick cooking spray, set aside.
  • Pat the pork dry with paper towels. Whisk the salt and seasonings together and evenly rub over all sides of the pork.
  • Heat 1 ½ tablespoon vegetable oil over high heat in a large cast iron skillet. Using tongs or 2 forks, sear pork on all sides until browned. Transfer pork the prepared slow cooker. Brush liquid smoke over the seared pork.
  • Cover (without any liquid) and cook on LOW for 8 to 12 hours. You may cook it on high for about 5-6 hours but LOW is best. Cook until pork is fall apart tender and easily shreds with a fork. Make sure to check the pork at 8 hours then continue to cook if needed.
  • Once very tender, shred the pork and toss with the slow cooker juices. Turn the slow cooker to low (if it had been on high), cover, and continue to cook for 20 minutes.
  • Taste and season with additional salt to taste; the pork should taste borderline too salty. Garnish with green onions if desired and serve with rice or see post for side serving options and fun ways to use the shredded pork.

Video

Notes

For different size pork

Use the arrows next to the serving size to adjust the pork pounds up or down.  This will automatically change the spices and liquid smoke or use the following formula:
  • ¾ teaspoons coarse sea salt per pound (pounds x .75= teaspoons)
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper, ground ginger and garlic powder per pound (pounds x .25 = teaspoons)

Expert cooking Tips

  • Pork shoulder/butt: if you have a choice between the two, always choose pork butt.  It has more  marbling throughout the meat so it emerges more flavorful and tender.
  • Hawaiian Sea Salt: places like Whole Foods, Sprouts and World Market sometimes carry Hawaiian sea salt or you can purchase it on Amazon here. If you can’t locate Hawaiian sea salt, pink Himalayan Sea Salt is the best substitute – don’t use kosher salt or table salt because the grains are much finer and will make your pork too salty! 
  • Liquid smoke: is a very common ingredient and should be easy to find next to the barbecue sauces in your grocery store.  You can use mesquite liquid smoke if you already have it, but I find hickory to be the best in this recipe.  
  • Seasonings:  the Kalua Pig is seasoned with garlic powder, ginger powder and pepper.  These seasonings are not traditional so you don’t have to use them, but I think they make for the best Kalua Pork recipe.  They add subtle complexity of flavor while still allowing the salt and the smokiness to shine.
  • Banana leaves:  to more closely mimic the flavor of authentic Kaula Pig, you can wrap your pork in banana leaves after you sear it and add the liquid smoke. You can find banana leaves sold in the freezer section of most Asian markets. Banana leaves are pretty large, so cut them down into a few smaller pieces.  Wrap the pork layer by layer in the banana leaves and don’t be alarmed if a few of them split, just do your best to encase the pork.
  • Serving suggestions:  see the post for sides to serve with Kalua Pig and ways to use the shredded pork from tacos to burritos to pork and cabbage.

To cook Kalua Pork in the oven:

  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.
  • Follow the recipe instructions up to adding the pork to the slow cooker. Instead, place the pork on a large piece of foil, large enough to wrap the pork up in.  Brush the seared pork all over with liquid smoke then wrap up in the foil. 
  • Place the pork on a rack in a roasting pan (or use halved onions to prop up if you don’t have one) with 1 cup of water in the bottom. Bake at 425 F for 30 minutes then reduce the temperature to 325 F and continue to roast for an additional 5-6 hours, adding additional water as needed so the water doesn’t dry up. Only check the water once an hour but don’t stress it, it’s not the end of the world if you need to leave and it dries up.
  • Remove the pork once super tender, shred with two forks then toss with juices from the bottom of the pan.

To cook Kalua Pork in the Instant Pot:

I do not recommend the instant pot as you lose flavor, richness and tenderness, but it is okay if you adjust your expectations. 
  • Cut the pork into large chunks so it will fit into the instant pot. Season with salt, ginger, garlic and pepper.  
  • Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil on the sauté setting. Brown the pork chunks on all sides then remove the pork and turn the pot off. Add ½ cup water and 1 ½ Tablespoons liquid smoke, stir and scrape up browned bits from the bottom of the instant pot. 
  • Return pork to the Instant Pot, cover, set the knob to seal. Cook on high pressure for 90 minutes (cook for 60 minutes if using a 4-pound roast). Once time is up, let pressure release naturally for 25 minutes, then manually release any remaining pressure and open.  Remove pork, shred, then toss with the liquid from Instant Pot and serve.

MAKE AHEAD

Cook the pork all the way through shredding.  Transfer the pork to the refrigerator directly in the ceramic crockpot insert or transfer the shredded pork in its juices to an airtight container in the refrigerator. The next day, warm the pork for 1-2 hours on low in the slow cooker or you can gently warm on the stove. Add a splash of water or chicken broth if it seems dry.

HOW TO STORE AND REHEAT

  • To store: transfer leftover Kalua Pig to an airtight container and store in the refrigerator for up to 5 days with any leftover juices.  
  • To freeze:  let the pork cool completely then transfer to a freezer safe container or portion it into smaller containers.  Thaw in the refrigerator overnight before reheating.
  • To reheat in the microwave:  warm the pork in the microwave for 1 minute then at 20 second intervals until warmed through.
  • To reheat on the stove:  heat a drizzle of oil in a large pot and rewarm the pork gently over medium-low heat, adding a splash of broth or water if the pork seems a little dry.
  • To reheat in the slow cooker: reheat in the slow cooker for 1-2 hours on low.

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2 Comments

  1. Kathy says

    I have been making this for several years. Another suggestion is to use it in a pork skillet, which we had on one of our trips to Hawaii. Make hash browns in a skillet then top with cheddar cheese, the warmed pork, some cooked spinach and over-easy or sunny side up eggs. Excellent for breakfast, but we like it for dinner.

    • Jen says

      ooooo, that sounds amazing, thanks so much for sharing!

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