Corned Beef Hash

Corned beef hash is the most delicious way to use up leftover corned beef!  Enjoy this corned beef Hash recipe piping hot for breakfast, lunch or dinner!

This corned beef hash transforms your St. Patrick’s Day corned beef into a hearty hash with chunks of savory, salty corned beef, diced crispy potatoes and aromatic onions and garlic all sautéed until slightly caramelized and crispy. I’ve also included the best cooking technique to deliver truly crispy breakfast hash.  You can finish off the corned beef hash recipe with runny eggs baked right into the skillet (makes the best yolk-y sauce!) or serve the eggs on the side or skip them all together.  No matter how or when you serve this homemade corned beef hash, it will have everyone begging for leftover corned beef!

We love savory breakfast dishes to make for weeknight dinners or for weekend breakfasts such as sausage breakfast casserole, eggs benedict casserole, and Monte Cristo sandwiches!

top view of corned beef hash in a skillet with corned beef, potatoes and onions

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Corned Beef Hash Recipe

I hope everyone enjoyed St. Patrick’s Day!  If you have leftover corned beef – this corned beef hash recipe is for you!  After all, what’s a celebration of homemade corned beef without the promise of corned beef hash for breakfast the next day?!  But don’t fret, if you don’t have leftovers, this hash recipe can also be made with deli-style corned beef or see my recipe variations for all sorts of substitutions.

This corned beef hash recipe delivers a hash loaded with tender corned beef, crispy potatoes, and caramelized onions with large sunny side up eggs to complete the meal.  You’ll love that it’s:

  • Easy
  • Versatile
  • Exploding with flavor
  • Delivers on the promise of crispy potatoes!

EASY

This corned beef hash recipe will transform your salty, rich leftovers into a simple, hearty, comforting meal that’s exploding with flavor and tastes as though it took hours to make – because it did, yesterday.  Today’s prep is minimal, all you need is about a pound of leftover corned beef, potatoes, onions, and garlic.  

We’ll roast the potatoes in the oven while you chop up the corned beef, onions and garlic, then it’ less than 20 minutes on the stove.  If you go the egg route, simply crack the eggs over the hash, cook briefly in the oven and you’ll have a meal-in-one with tender whites and runny yolk all in one dish!  P.S. Mopping up runny yolks with corned beef hash is the best way to eat eggs – ever.

VERSATILE

Of course, this breakfast hash is extremely versatile and can also include any other vegetables you have on hand such as chopped fresh bell peppers, leftover cooked carrots, Brussels sprouts, etc.  It’s so versatile, you can enjoy it throughout the year! 

CRISPY POTATOES

If you’ve never made hash before, don’t worry, it’s really easy, especially because the corned beef is already cooked. The main element we want to pay attention to is the potatoes.  Many recipes promise crispy potatoes but underdeliver. 

This corned beef hash recipe boasts the crispiest, most flavorful, no fuss potatoes, by first roasting them in the oven then toasting them in the skillet before combining everything together.  And bonus, the entire hash is now laced with tantalizing roasted flavor.  Now we truly have the perfect contrast of flavorful, crusty, crispy potatoes, tender corned beef and that soft, velvety egg yolk pooling throughout.  

Now let’s get cooking so you can enjoy this homemade corned beef hash for breakfast, lunch or dinner, 365 days of the year!

I’m going to go into detail about how to make corned beef hash, recipe variations, tips for success, etc. so you can read on or use the “jump to recipe” button located at the top of the page to skip directly to the recipe.

What is Corned Beef Hash?

Corned beef hash is a fabulous way to stretch and reinvent last night’s leftovers!  It’s a type of breakfast skillet consisting of cooked chopped meat (in this case corned beef), diced potatoes and onions all cooked up in a jumble until crispy.   The great thing about homemade corned beef hash is you can add anything to it!  Think of a hash as a catch all, much like frittatas, omelets, and quiche – use it to clean out your fridge to create a fabulous breakfast, lunch or dinner.  What makes corned beef hash especially awesome, is the corned beef is so flavorful, anything you add will taste great!

Why is it called corned beef hash?

The term corned beef hash is twofold: 

  • Corned beef:  is essentially flat-cut brisket cured in a salt brine with vibrant, pungent pickling spices and pink curing salt which gives it its signature pink color. It was during the 17th century that salted beef was coined “corned beef” by the British to describe the corn-kernel-size salt crystals used to cure the meat during the “corning” process.
  • Hash: comes from the French verb hacher, meaning to chop.  Hash has come to mean a dish made out of leftover chopped ingredients, particularly meat, potatoes and onions, pan fried in a skillet.

Thus, corned beef hash is a hash of corned beef!

What is the origin of hash? 

Breakfast hash, in its enumerable variations, has been enjoyed all around the world from England and Ireland to Denmark, Portugal, Germany, Brazil, etc. for hundreds of years.  It was popularized in America, England and France during and after WWII when food was being rationed, as it was an easy and delicious way to stretch and repurpose leftovers. 

Is corned beef hash from Ireland?

What we know and love as corned beef hash is actually not an Irish tradition.  Ireland was renowned for the best corned beef in the 1800s and supplied it to much of Europe and America.  Ironically, Ireland’s prized corned beef was widely too expensive for the local Irish. It was Irish American immigrants who started the tradition of eating corned beef on St. Patrick’s Day because it was a less expensive substitute for ham. It didn’t take long for corned beef and cabbage to become synonymous with St. Patrick’s Day in America.  Corned beef hash was a natural extension of this dish and the perfect use for leftover corned beef and potatoes.

showing how to make corned beef hash by adding corned beef, diced potatoes and onions to a skillet

Homemade Corned Beef Hash Ingredients

The ingredients for homemade corned beef hash are minimal but the resulting dish is an explosion of flavor.  You’ll need corned beef, potatoes, onions, garlic and seasonings. I also like to add Worcestershire sauce to cut through the richness and a bell pepper to add freshness.  As far as the particulars, the type of corned beef and potatoes do make a difference:    

What kind of corned beef to use?

Corned beef is rich, salty, spicy, and tender with so many layers of flavor it’s the perfect flavor bomb to make this breakfast hash recipe!

You have four options as to which corned beef to use:

  1. Corned beef from scratch: You can make your own corned beef from scratch by brining beef brisket with kosher salt and pickling spices like peppercorns, mustard seed, allspice berries and coriander seeds, then oven roasting until tender. I love to make a large corned beef for St. Patrick’s Day so there’s the guarantee of leftovers for homemade corned beef hash!
  2. Store-bought corned beef:  By nature of its name, “corned beef” that you purchase at the grocery store comes already cured/”corned” in its own pickling spices, all you do is cook it according to package directions.  This is a great shortcut for semi-homemade corned beef.
  3. Deli-style corned beef:  Did you know the deli sell corned beef?  I have not personally purchased it so I can’t vouch for flavor and tenderness, but this could be a viable option for any day, every day corned beef hash.  When purchasing the corned beef, ask for ½-inch thick slices, then all you have to do is slice it the other direction to create cubes.
  4. Canned corned beef: Is not recommended if you’re looking for higher quality corned beef.  Canned corned beef will most likely be made from lower quality, fattier cuts of meat, not necessarily beef brisket.  The canning process requires product in the can to be heated under pressure to 250+ F, this high temperature can impact flavor and texture.

Can I use pastrami instead of corned beef?

Yes, you can use cubed or shredded pastrami. Pastrami is corned beef that has been cured in the same pickling solution but it is rubbed with seasonings and smoked instead of left naked and boiled or roasted. 

What potatoes are best in hash?

There is quite the debate between which potato is best for hash: Russets or Yukon gold?  This corned beef hash recipe calls for Russet potatoes, but you can use whatever potatoes you have on hand, they just won’t get as crispy and caramelized as Russets.  Here’s the breakdown:

  • Russet potatoes are the best choice to use for crispy corned beef hash for the same reason they’re the #1 choice for French fries:  they are the starchiest and therefore will become the crispiest.  Their high starch and low moisture content means they dry out on the outside resulting in a crispy exterior with a fluffy, buttery tender interior.   Russet potatoes may also be labeled as Idaho or baking potatoes.  If you have the option, choose Burbank Russets because they develop a crisper texture and cook more evenly than Norkotah Russets, the other widely available variety.
  • Yukon Gold potatoes will still produce crispy crusts, but will never become as crispy as russets.  Equally important, they cook up denser and creamier inside, rather than fluffy; which isn’t really my thing for hash.
  • Red waxy potatoes are not recommended because they will never develop a very crispy crust. You can still use them, but adjust your expectations accordingly.

Can I use pre-diced potatoes?

Yes, you can use store bought hash browned potatoes but they just won’t get as crispy.

Corned Beef Hash with Eggs

Corned beef hash is good but corned beef hash with eggs is exponentially better!  Just imagine the buttery, velvety yolk drizzling over the skillet, the perfect creamy contrast to the crispy potatoes and beef. 

As far as what eggs to serve – my favorite is soft baked eggs cooked directly in the skillet.  So easy, and the ideal texture.  But you can also serve homemade corned beef hash with fried eggs, poached eggs or scrambled eggs, totally your call.

How to cook Corned Beef Hash:

Wondering how to make corned beef hash?   You’ll love how easy it is! 

  • Cook the potatoes in the oven:  This hand-off method achieves the best textured and flavored potatoes and ensures the russets don’t easily fall apart.  Toss cubed potatoes with some olive oil, salt, pepper and paprika and bake for about 18 minutes.
  • Fry the potatoes in a skillet:  Once the potatoes are tender, add them to a hot skillet and sizzle away until golden and crispy. 
  • Sauté onions and bell pepper:  Add the chopped onions and bell pepper to the skillet and sauté until the onions are tender. 
  • Combine all the ingredients:  Add the corned beef, garlic, Worcestershire sauce and all seasonings and sauté 1 minute to warm through.
  • Cook in a single layer:  Next, spread everything into an evenly layer in the skillet and cook undisturbed, for a couple minutes, then flip and repeat several times, until crispy and golden all over.
showing how to make corned beef hash by cooking potatoes in a baking pan

How to Make Corned beef Hash with Eggs

I love how easy corned beef hash with eggs is to make! 

  • Hollow out 3-4 few wells in your hash and crack an egg in each one.  Season the eggs with salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil.  The olive oil is optional but helps prevent a film from forming.
  • Pop the skillet in the oven and bake at 375 degrees F for 12-15 minutes or until the eggs are cooked to your liking.  I prefer and recommend soft and runny yolks – especially delish with the corned beef hash.
showing how to make corned beef hash with eggs by cracking eggs in the hash before putting in the oven
showing how to make corned beef hash with eggs by baking eggs in the skillet with the hash

How to make Corned Beef Hash Crispy

Since we’re going through the effort of making this corned beef hash recipe, we might as well follow a few simple techniques to make it crispy!  Here’s what to watch out for:

Step 1: Use Russet Potatoes

The type of potato you use in hash will determine your degree of that coveted crispy crust. As previously discussed, the starchy russet potatoes boast the ideal texture; becoming the very crispiest on the outside while fluffing up on the inside; the only way to go for truly crispy corned beef hash.    

Step 2: Par-cook the potatoes by Roasting

Creating crispy hash potatoes is based on the same science as making crispy French Fries, you have to double cook them.  The purpose of the first cook is twofold: 1) it cooks and therefore softens the potatoes and 2) coats the exterior in a layer of gelatinized starch.  The second cook at a higher temperature in the skillet dehydrates the gelatinized starch and browns it, creating the coveted golden, crispy crunch.

So, what method is best for the first cook? Roasting! Boiling potatoes creates water-logged potatoes and skillet potatoes are uneven and laborious. Instead, roasting the potatoes coated in olive oil and spices creates golden potatoes without the fuss of flipping or the bland flavor of boiling.

Step 3: Cook the potatoes and corned beef separately

I know it’s tempting to throw everything into the skillet at once, and you certainly can if you’re not expecting crispy corned beef hash.  The problem with adding all the ingredients at once, however, is the corned beef, onions and optional bell pepper will burn before the potatoes are crispy, and even then, the potatoes won’t get super crispy because they need to be in constant contact with the pan to crisp up, a problem when they’re overwhelmed competing for surface area.

Instead, we’ll cook the potatoes, remove them from the skillet, then add the corned beef.  This way, everything is perfectly crisp – and not in the burnt to a crisp way.

Step 3: Cook the potatoes in oil

The potatoes need to be shallow pan fried in oil in order to become super crispy.  By frying the potatoes first, you are guaranteed crispy potatoes and bonus, they taste amazing from drinking up some of the fat. Once the potatoes are crispy, you can discard all but 1 tablespoon of the oil and continue making the corned beef hash.   

When cooking the potatoes, don’t stir too soon or too often. Let the bottom get crispy, gently stir and fold, and then leave it for another minute to crisp up.

Step 4: Resist the urge to stir the corned beef

Once the potatoes are fried, it’s the corned beef’s turn.  The secret to crispy corned beef is to pat it into a single layer so as much surface area comes in contact with the pan as possible.  Now, resist the urge to stir the hash.   Let it sizzle and sear undisturbed to golden glory for a couple minutes before flipping it over to crisp up the other side.  

Tips for the best Corned Beef Hash

We’ve covered how to make corned beef hash crispy, so here are just some final notes for a sizzling success:

  • Serve anytime!  While this corned beef hash is technically a breakfast recipe, it is delicious all day, any time of the year.  It is a great breakfast-for-dinner meal!
  • Use a cast iron skillet: This recipe requires a hot skillet so I recommend using a cast iron skillet.  Cast iron transfers and retains heat evenly which in turn cooks your food more quickly and evenly and will crisp up your potatoes beautifully.  It also transfers to the oven seamlessly so you only need one skillet if you add eggs to the hash.  
  • Can I use a nonstick skillet?:  If you don’t have a cast iron skillet, you will want to double check your nonstick skillet can handle medium-high heat for prolong time without ruining the finish. Nonstick will also require a longer cook time because it doesn’t retain heat as well.
  • Maintain heat:  Make sure you’re cooking the corned beef hash at medium-high heat so everything gets nice and crispy. The ingredients can’t crisp up without enough heat.
  • Chop hash evenly:  Chop both the potatoes and the corned beef into uniform sizes so they cook evenly. 
  • Store-bought corned beef:  If you don’t have leftover corned beef brisket, you can buy purchase corned beef in the deli section of most grocery stores. Ask them to slice it ½-inch thick, then slice it the opposite direction when you get it home.  This will create ½-inch cubes the same size as the potatoes.
  • Use russet potatoes:  I suggest russet potatoes for the crispiest exterior and fluffy interior but you can also use Yukon gold for crispy and creamy.  Leftover roasted potatoes will also work great!   
up close of coned beef hash recipe showing how crispy the potatoes are

CORNED BEEF HASH recipe VARIATIONS

This corned beef hash recipe is made with minimal ingredients so it’s the perfect recipe to dress up or use whatever ingredients you have on hand.  Here are a few ideas:

  • Protein: If you don’t have leftover corned beef, try this recipe with deli corned beef, pastrami, smoked brisket, short ribs, pulled pork, cubed ham, sausage or bacon.  Note that that corned beef is incredibly flavorful so be prepared to season to taste if using in alternative protein.
  • Sweet potatoes:  Swap the russet potatoes for chopped sweet potatoes.  Season and roast the sweet potatoes like you would the russets, but only pan fry in a little olive oil for a couple minutes because they will never get very crispy. 
  • Vegetables: You can add vegetables to this hash such as bell peppers, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, mushrooms, carrots, corn, zucchini, kale, etc.
  • Potato alternatives:  If you’re looking to save carbs, swap the potatoes for another root vegetable such as parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, etc. Obviously, these vegetables won’t get crispy, so skip the solo pan fry and add them to the skillet with the corned beef.
  • Eggs:  While I prefer to add the eggs directly to the skillet for ease, you can also add a side of poached, fried or scrambled eggs.  
  • Cheese:  Who doesn’t love cheesy potatoes?  While cheese isn’t a traditional hash ingredient, a handful of shredded white cheddar cheese is magic.
  • Herbs: The homemade corned beef hash is seasoned with dried herbs so they don’t burn, but you are welcome to finish the dish off with fresh herbs as well such as parsley, thyme, green onions or chives.
  • Spice it up:  Taste the hash first then season with some hot sauce or red pepper flakes if you like it spicy.

Make Ahead Corned Beef Hash

I prefer this corned beef hash made-to-order so the potatoes stay crispy but you can still prep ahead:

  • Cook corned beef:  Cook the corned beef if you’re making it from scratch.
  • Chop corned beef:  Chop corned beef into cubes and store it in an airtight container in the fridge.
  • Roast potatoes:  Chop, season and roast potatoes.  Let the potatoes cool completely before transferring to an airtight container and storing in the refrigerator.
  • Chop aromatics:  Chop the onions and garlic and store in separate airtight containers in the fridge.
  • Storage: Keep the leftovers in the fridge and eat within the week.

WHAT GOES WELL WITH CORNED BEEF HASH?

Corned beef hash is a hearty meat and potatoes breakfast that pairs well with other Irish favorites such as sautéed cabbage or soda bread along with zesty, bright creamy horseradish sauce.  If you want to be extra festive, you could pick and choose items from a traditional Irish breakfast which includes bacon rashers, pork sausages, baked beans, pan fried tomatoes and black pudding.  If you want to balance it with your sweet tooth, serve it with a stack of lemon ricotta pancakes, French toast muffins or banana cream cheese coffee cake.

If you’re not serving corned beef hash for breakfast, try pairing it with a refreshing green salad, green bean salad or tomato cucumber salad, or another vegetable such as roasted broccoli, roasted asparagus or roasted green beans.

HOW LONG IS CORNED BEEF Hash GOOD FOR?

  • To store:  Corned beef hash should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3-4 days.
  • To freeze: Corned beef hash can be frozen for up to three months, but keep in mind it will not be very crispy once thawed, but it will still be plenty flavorful.  You can freeze a large batch or portion it into smaller plastic bags for an easy thaw and heat breakfast.
  • To reheat: Heat a little butter or olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat.  Add the hash and warm through, then turn the heat to medium – high and cook until crispy again.
showing how to serve homemade corned beef hash recipe by adding hash to a plate and topping with a sunny side up egg

Corned Beef Hash

This corned beef hash transforms your St. Patrick’s Day corned beef into a hearty hash with chunks of savory, salty corned beef, diced crispy potatoes and aromatic onions and garlic all sautéed until slightly caramelized and crispy. I’ve also included the best cooking technique to deliver truly crispy breakfast hash.  You can finish off the corned beef hash recipe with runny eggs baked right into the skillet (makes the best yolk-y sauce!) or serve the eggs on the side or skip them all together.  No matter how or when you serve this corned beef hash, it will have everyone begging for leftover corned beef!
Servings: 4 servings
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • ½ large onion, chopped
  • 2 cups corned beef, chopped ½-inch dice
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ tsp EACH dried parsley, dried oregano, dried thyme, dried basil
  • salt and pepper to taste

POTATOES

  • 1 pound russet potatoes, peeled, chopped 1/2-inch dice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ¼ tsp EACH salt, pepper, smoked paprika

Instructions

Roast Potatoes

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with foil and lightly grease with cooking spray. Add potatoes, 1 tablespoon olive oil, ¼ tsp EACH salt, pepper, and smoked paprika. Toss until evenly coated then spread into a single layer.
  • Bake for 18 minutes, or just until barely fork tender; remove from the oven and set aside. Meanwhile, chop corned beef, onions and garlic. If adding eggs to the skillet later, reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees F.

Skillet Hash

  • Heat 3 tablespoons vegetable oil in a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the roasted potatoes and spread into a single layer. Cook until crispy, flipping occasionally so they brown evenly. Once, crispy, remove from the skillet. Drain all but 1 tablespoon oil from the skillet.
  • To the remaining oil, melt 1 tablespoons butter over medium heat. Increase heat to medium-high and add onions (and bell pepper if using); cook until onions are softened, 3-5 minutes.
  • Add the corned beef, garlic, Worcestershire sauce and all seasonings, stir to combine and cook for 1 minute. If you want the potatoes to stay extra crispy, add them at the very end, otherwise, you can stir them in now.
  • Next, spread everything into an evenly layer in the pan and cook undisturbed for a couple minutes, then stir and repeat a couple times until the skillet is golden and crispy all over. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Video

Notes

  • Store-bought corned beef:  If you don’t have leftover corned beef brisket, you can buy purchase corned beef in the deli section of most grocery stores. Ask them to slice it ½-inch thick, then slice it the opposite direction when you get it home.  This will create ½-inch cubes the same size as the potatoes.
  • Use russet potatoes:  I suggest russet potatoes for the crispiest exterior and fluffy interior but you can also use Yukon gold, the just won’t get as crispy. 
  • Protein: If you don’t have leftover corned beef, try this recipe with deli corned beef, pastrami, smoked brisket, short ribs, pulled pork, cubed ham, sausage or bacon.  Note that that corned beef is incredibly flavorful so be prepared to season to taste if using in alternative protein.
  • Vegetables: You can add vegetables to this hash such as bell peppers, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, mushrooms, carrots, corn, zucchini, kale, etc.

HOW to Store and Reheat

  • To store:  Corned beef hash should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3-4 days.
  • To freeze: Corned beef hash can be frozen for up to three months, but keep in mind it will not be very crispy once thawed, but it will still be plenty flavorful.  You can freeze a large batch or portion it into smaller plastic bags for an easy thaw and heat breakfast.
  • To reheat: Heat a little butter or olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat.  Add the hash and warm through, then turn the heat to medium – high and cook until crispy again.

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2 Comments

  1. Ramya says

    Will be making this soon with few subs can i use mushrooms as am a vegan sorry for early comment as am in Singapore will dm you if i make this and let me know how it goes Thanks Ramya

    • Jen says

      Yes you can certainly use mushrooms or tofu. I would pan fry them separately so they get nice and crispy.