Peach Cobbler

The best homemade peach cobbler recipe with juicy, tender peaches and a thick sugar and cinnamon biscuit-cake topping! 

Everyone need the best Peach Cobbler recipe in their easy baking repertoire, and this is it! Sweet peaches are laced with butter, cinnamon, nutmeg and a splash of vanilla and lemon juice then blanketed in a pillowy, crispy, sugar cinnamon topping that’s somewhere between a biscuit and a cake; crispy on the top and soft and fluffy underneath. Add some cold vanilla ice cream and dig into heaven. This homemade Peach Cobbler may look and taste impressive but it’s is one of the easiest, tastiest summer desserts of all time!  Plus, it can be prepped ahead of time (the filling and topping separate), for an easy stress-free dessert that will disappear in a flash!

Fruit desserts are always a treat in the summer!  Some of our favorites include apple crisp, pear crisp, fresh strawberry pie, key lime cheesecake, blueberry cheesecake, lemon blueberry cake, strawberry shortcake cake and of course this new Peach Cobbler recipe!

This post details the history of cobbler, how to select the best peaches and how to make Peach Cobbler with expert tips and tricks. Read on or use the JUMP TO RECIPE BUTTON at the top of the page to skip directly to the recipe.
up close scooping up homemade peach cobbler

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easy peach cobbler RECIPE

This easy Peach Cobbler recipe will convert even the toughest critics!  My husband and I literally devoured half of the pan right after I was done with photos – and we could have kept going! 

To come up with the best Peach Cobbler recipe, I researched and experimented with many recipe variations so you don’t have to.  I experimented with adding or omitting butter in the filling, what spices to add, how thick to slice the peaches, using all granulated sugar or a combination of brown and white, whether or not to add lemon juice to the peaches and how much cornstarch and sugar to create the perfect juicy, filling that’s not runny or gummy but instead coated in a juicy, luscious, syrupy glaze.  In the end, this homemade Peach Cobbler was born.  And it is worth the wait. Everyone will be raving about this easy recipe as they go back for seconds and thirds.

What I especially love about this recipe is how easy it is. It’s simple enough to throw together on a random weeknight but glorious enough to serve at Sunday dinner. Little ones will love it, adults will love it, and YOU will love how easy it is! So, if you’re If you’re planning on serving this Peach Cobbler anytime soon, make sure everyone has saved plenty of room for dessert, it’s worth the wait.

Why this peach cobbler recipe is the best!

  • A quick, lazy dessert that’s easier than pie!  It’s a slice, dump and bake dessert that can be made at a moment’s notice – no making pie crust, no chilling pie crust, etc. BUT it delivers all of the warm satisfying comforting flavors you love about pie PLUS that satisfying buttery crunch. 
  • Delicious with the best filling and topping! As the Peach Cobbler bakes, butter, cinnamon, nutmeg and a splash of vanilla and lemon juice infuse the increasingly juicy, tender peaches with flavor and mix with the juices to create a sweet, buttery glaze. The topping bakes up light and pillowy with a crunchy crust giving way to a soft interior- it’s so good you’ll want to eat it plain!  The whole cobbler is a beautiful marriage of warm, tender, sweet, soft and crunchy mingled with creamy, cooling vanilla ice cream.  
  • Uses basic pantry friendly ingredients – just grab the peaches!  You probably have all of the ingredients stocked to make this easy Peach Cobbler recipe already. Most of the ingredients are basic pantry staples:  sugar, flour, cornstarch, salt, baking powder, butter, cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla.  Plus, you can use the easy milk + lemon juice to create your own buttermilk.
  • It’s make ahead friendly for a stress free dessert. The topping and the peaches can be prepped ahead of time and stored separately.  When you’re ready to bake, simply bake the peaches for 15 minutes, add the topping then bake to glorious golden splendor.  
  • It’s easily adaptable. This recipe can be made with canned or frozen peaches so you can make it year-round!  You can also swap in any of your favorite fruits.  All instructions to follow.

What is peach cobbler?

Cobbler is a deep-dish baked dessert made of a fruit filling such as apples, blueberries, blackberries and cherries – and in this case – peaches!  The peaches are tossed in sugar and cornstarch in large baking dish then topped with a thick dropped-biscuit topping that includes a leavening agent so it rises a bit and becomes soft and crispy. 

There are many variations of Peach Cobbler.  Some recipes are more like a cake, with a cake-like batter prepared on the bottom of the pan and then peaches are incorporated.  Some Peach Cobblers are topped with a pastry crust topping, and some are topped with a more cake-like topping.  To me, however, Peach Cobbler isn’t a cake or a pie! It necessitates a luscious peach layered bottom and a sweet, thick biscuit topping. And this recipe is just that.

What does cobbler mean?

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CRIsP AND a cOBBLER?

We all know we love Peach Cobbler, but how is it different than a crisp or crumble?   The main difference comes down to the topping.  In a cobbler, the topping is a dough with a rising agent like baking powder that bakes up into a slightly sweet, biscuit-like topping. In crisp, the topping is made with flour, sugar, butter, oats and sometimes nuts without a leavening agent.  The topping is sprinkled over the fruit before baking.  As the crisp bakes, the butter melts and mixes with the flour and sugar to create a crunchy, crumbly topping instead of a cohesive biscuit-like one.

Where did Peach Cobbler Originate from?

Flashforward to the 1950s and Peach Cobbler was a staple, beloved American dessert. Today, there are several variations of cobbler – torte, pandowdy, sonker, grunt, slump, buckles, crisp, croustade, bird’s nest pudding, and crow’s nest pudding – all boasting elements in common (fruit, butter, sugar, and flour), but there is only one true cobbler – a juicy fruit layer topped with sweet biscuit topping, just like the American settlers used to make.

Fun fact:  the “World’s Largest Peach Cobbler” can be seen and tasted at the annual Georgia Peach Festival. This huge dish is 11 by five feet and eight inches deep.  The recipe requires 75 gallons of local peaches, 90 pounds of real butter, 32 gallons of whole milk, 150 pounds of wheat flour, and 150 pounds of sugar.

top view of easy peach cobbler recipe with biscuit topping

WHAT ARE THE BEST peaches FOR cobbler?

Choose ripe, fresh, somewhat firm yellow peaches for the best tasting Peach Cobbler.  The better the peaches, the better the cobbler will taste!  Ripe peaches will deliver, sweet, full flavored cobbler whereas unripe peaches won’t be as juicy, flavorful or sweet. 

Take care, however, that the peaches aren’t too ripe.  They should be fragrant and peel easily but still be somewhat firm, and not squishy or you’ll end up with mushy peaches and a mushy topping because of excessive juices.  Also, avoid peaches with bruises or molding.

How to tell if peaches are ripe

  • Smell:  a ripe peach will give off a sweet aroma, unlike unripe peaches which won’t smell like anything, which means they won’t taste like anything.
  • Touch:  a ripe peach should be slightly soft, meaning there is some “give” when gently squeezed.  To test, gently squeeze the peach with your whole hand and not just your fingertips – using your fingertips will bruise the fruit. If a peach feels firm or hard to your touch, it isn’t ripe yet. Purchase only if you plan to use the fruit several days in the future. The harder the peaches are, the longer they will take to ripen. 
  • Color:  a ripe peach has a dark yellow color without any hints of green.  Green is a tell-tell sign it is not ripe.  A ripe peach is not necessarily red; red simply comes from direct sun exposure.

How can I ripen peaches more quickly?

  • Option 1: add them to a brown bag with a banana, apple or kiwi and fold the top of the bag over so it’s sealed.  These fruits release a lot of ethylene which triggers ripening in the peaches.  Leave the bag closed on the counter for 1-3 days, depending on how ripe they were to begin with.
  • Option 2:  keep the peaches in a warm, sunny place. To speed up the ripening process further, place the brown bag with the peaches and fruit in a warm place.

To slow down the ripening process of your peaches, place them in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Can I make peach cobbler with unripe peaches?

If the peaches are completely hard and unripe, I would not use them to make peach cobbler. They will be flavorless, won’t release juices to create jammy filling and you won’t even be able to peel the peaches away from the pit!  If the peaches are starting to ripen but not very soft, they can be used, but you will likely run into the same problem and not be able to remove them from the pit – worst case scenario, chop straight through the pit.  If the peaches are on the firmer side, you may need to increase the baking time and add additional sugar to compensate for the lack of sweetness.

SHOULD I PEEL peaches FOR cobbler?

Yes, please peel your peaches for this Peach Cobbler recipe.  There are a couple Peach Cobbler recipes floating around without peeled peaches, but there is a reason 99% of recipes call for peeled peaches.  If you don’t peel your peaches, you’re left with an unpleasant texture as the skin doesn’t break down enough to be inconsequential when baking. It also can separate from the peaches and get stuck in your teeth!

How do I peel peaches?

You will need to peel firmer peaches with a vegetable peeler (the below blanching technique will not work for them) and for softer, riper peaches, you can blanch and then the skins will slip right off. It’s a game changer when peeling lot of peaches like in this recipe.

HOW TO EASILY PEEL PEACHES:

Here’s how to blanch and peel peaches using this easy shortcut:

  • Step 1:  Boil water.   Fill a pot with water and bring to a boil.  There should be enough liquid to cover the peaches when submerged.   You will only be blanching 2-3 peaches at a time, so the pot doesn’t need to be very wide. Meanwhile, prepare an ice bath and score the peaches.
  • Step 2:  Score peaches.  Using a sharp knife, make a shallow 2-inch wide “X” on the bottom of each peach with the core as the center of the X.  The hot water lifts the skin where the knife score is. This also creates a little tab that makes it easier to grab and pull the skin off with your fingers. 
  • Step 3:  Blanch peaches:  Gently lower 2-3 peaches at a time into a pot of boiling water using a spider strainer.  The hot water almost instantly separates the peach skin from the flesh. Let them boil for about 20-30 seconds, until you see the score mark on the skin peel away. Don’t leave the fruit in the water for longer than 30 seconds or it will cook and become mushy in the cobbler.
  • Step 4:  Chill peaches.   Immediately transfer the peaches to the prepared ice bath. The cold ice water will prevent the peaches from continuing to cook.  After about one minute, remove, and dry the peaches before peeling.
  • Step 5:  Peel peaches.  Using your fingertips or a small paring knife, grab a tab of skin created by scoring the peaches.  Peel the skin away and it should slip right off!  If the skin isn’t peeling easily, fear not, simply add the peach back to the pot and blanch again. You can also use a paring knife to help remove the skin or shave off any stubborn areas.
up close of scooping easy peach cobbler with fresh peaches

homemade peach cobbler INGREDIENTS

You probably have everything you need to make this homemade Peach Cobbler in your pantry right now except for the peaches!  In addition to peaches, you will need:

for the FILLING:

  • Butter:  use unsalted butter so we can control the salt.  The butter melts and mixes with the sugars to envelop peaches in a light buttery syrup. If you only have salted butter, then omit the salt in the filling.
  • Cornstarch:  thickening the filling is necessary because peaches release juice when cooked.  This is to our advantage because the juices mingle with the sugar, warm spices, lemon juice and vanilla to create a sweet, self-basting sauce that’s the perfect syrupy consistency thanks to cornstarch, without becoming gummy.  Without cornstarch, the juices would create a watery filling. I went conservative on the cornstarch because nothing is worse than a gummy filling! If your peaches are extra ripe/soft, consider adding an extra 1/2-1 tablespoon cornstarch.
  • Lemon juice and zest: the slight acidity helps balance the sweetness and enhances the peaches’ flavor. 
  • Sugars: a combination of granulated sugar and light brown sugar sweeten the filling with just a hint of molasses.
  • Vanilla extract: adds an extra oomph of flavor.  Use quality extract for the best flavor.
  • Spices:  cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt enhance the flavors and balance out the sweetness. Use more or less to taste.

THE cOBBLER TOPPING:

  • Flour:  please use all -purpose flour or gluten-free 1 to 1 baking flour.
  • Baking powder:  leavens the topping giving it volume and a light, fluffy texture.  Make sure your baking powder is fresh so it works!
  • Sugar:  promotes a soft and tender topping by absorbing some of the liquid and slowing down the formation of gluten strands.  It also promotes caramelization for a more golden crust.
  • Butter: helps bind the ingredients together and adds buttery goodness.  Cube your butter then chill it so it’s nice and cold.  Use unsalted butter so we can control the salt.  If you only have salted butter, reduce the salt in the topping to ¼ teaspoon.  
  • Buttermilk:  adds flavor and creates more tender and moist topping.  You can also substitute with sour milk which I do all the time by adding 1 tablespoon lemon juice or white vinegar to a liquid measuring cup, adding milk until it reaches ¾ cup, giving it a stir, and letting it rest for 10 minutes.
  • Salt:  adds flavor but equally important, it allows the gluten to hold more carbon dioxide, allowing the dough to expand and stretch without tearing and achieve a fluffier biscuit topping.
  • Cinnamon and sugar: because even the topping needs to be seasoned!  I use raw sugar/coarse sugar because it has larger, coarser granules and a hint of molasses for superior crunch, sparkle and flavor, but you may substitute with granulated sugar.

HOW TO MAKE peach cobbler

Homemade Peach Cobbler is a beloved dessert not only because its DELICOUS but because it’s so easy to make!  Here’s how to make it:

STEP 1:  cook peaches

It’s necessary to give the peaches a head start in the oven so they will be tender by the time the topping is cooked.  Cooking the peaches also is crucial because the hot peaches help to cook the underside of the biscuit topping.  If the peaches aren’t piping hot, the bottom of the cobbler won’t cook.

To pre-cook the peaches, add the peeled peaches, sugars, butter, cornstarch, lemon juice and zest, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt to a lightly greased 9×13 baking dish and give it a stir.  Bake for 15 minutes.  You’ll notice the peaches will be super runny when you take them out of the oven.  This is because they haven’t been brought to a boil to activate the cornstarch.  The peaches will become perfectly tender and the liquid will thicken to a glorious jammy syrup after it’s fully cooked.  

a collage showing how to make peach cobbler by adding peaches, lemon juice, vanilla, butter, cornstarch cinnamon and nutmeg to peaches

STEP 2:  make the topping

Don’t dilly dally while the peaches are baking.  You need to start the topping right away so it can be immediately added to the hot peaches.  You can make the topping in a bowl and cut in the butter or I HIGHLY recommend using a food processor.  It eliminates all the elbow grease and allows you to make the topping in minutes with a couple pulses.

To make, pulse (or whisk) together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Add the cubed, cold butter and pulse a couple times several times until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs (the largest piece of butter should be no larger than pea-size). If not using a food processor, cut the butter into the dry ingredients with a pastry cutter.

a collage showing how to make peach cobbler by mixing flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a food processor then adding butter

Add the buttermilk and vanilla and pulse a few times to moisten (don’t overmix). If not using a food processor, make a well in the center of the mixture and add the buttermilk to the center. Fold together with a spatula until it begins to come together but don’t overwork the dough.

a collage showing how to make peach cobbler by adding buttermilk to food processor and then pulsing to combine

STEP 3:  add the topping

Remove the peaches from oven and immediately add the topping.  I have found the best tasting topping is made by dropping grape size spoonfuls all over the peaches.  Start with the edges first, otherwise the peach juice will boil over when baked and cover the cobbler.  If you have extra dough after you have added the topping, double it up in some of the thinner areas until all of it is used.  Lastly, sprinkle the topping with coarse sugar and ground cinnamon.  This creates extra crunch and extra flavor.

a collage showing how to make peach cobbler by baking peaches then adding the biscuit topping

STEP 4:  bake

Bake in middle of oven at 375°F for 45-55 minutes, until the peaches are bubbling and the topping is deeply golden.

showing how to make peach cobbler by baking homemade peach cobbler until the topping is golden

STEP 5:  SERVE

Let Peach Cobbler stand for 15 minutes before serving. This will give the sauce a chance to thicken a little more as it cools. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream!

a pan of peach cobbler recipe with fresh peaches

TIPS FOR BEST HOMEMADE PEACH COBBLER RECIPE

  • Slice peaches thinly, but no too thin.  Try and slice your peaches about 1/4-inch thick and not any smaller so they become tender but not mushy in the allotted baking time (the time it takes for the topping to cook). 
  • Slice peaches uniformly.  Uniform thinly sliced peaches ensure you beautifully tender peaches throughout without some crunchy ones mixed in.
  • Use more cornstarch for extra ripe peaches.  If your peaches are extra ripe/soft, consider increasing the cornstarch by ½ to 1 tablespoon.
  • Use real butter.   If you want the BEST Peach Cobbler recipe, you must use real butter, margarine won’t have the same effect.
  • Make sure the butter is cold for the biscuit topping. Cold butter melts as the topping bakes which releases steam and creates little pockets of air which translates into an airy, soft topping underneath the crispy crust.  If the butter melts or softens before the topping bakes, it will be hard and flat.   I like to chop the butter then place it back in the refrigerator to ensure it’s extra cold.
  • Add the topping to piping hot peaches. Make sure the peaches are piping hot before adding the topping, otherwise the bottom of the cobbler doesn’t cook. To achieve this, begin making the topping as soon as the peaches go into the oven, or you can even make it first and refrigerate. 
  • Leave some space in between the topping.  When dropping the topping onto the peach filling, make sure to leave a few gaps otherwise the cobbler will steam both the fruit and the topping and you’re left with a runny filling and soggy topping underneath.  Leaving a few gaps will allow steam to escape so the peaches caramelize, the filling thickens, and the bottom of the topping cooks.
  • Don’t overwork the biscuit dough.  Don’t overmix, over-pulse or over-handle the dough.  Overworking the dough will melt the butter and over-activate the gluten in the flour, resulting in a hard, flat topping. It’s okay if the dough is a little crumbly.
  • Prevent burnt topping.  I never have the problem of a burnt topping –but if it’s your first time making this Peach Cobbler recipe, keep an eye on it to be safe.  If the topping starts to brown too quickly, then lay a piece of foil over the top and bake on.
  • Watch for a bubbling filling.  It’s important to bake the Peach Cobbler until the topping is deeply golden and you see syrup bubbling up all around the edges of the pan.  This is a sign the filling has thickened in the middle.  If you skip this sign, then the filling will be runny beneath the cobbler.  If this happens to you, pop the cobbler back in the oven and cover with foil if the topping is becoming too dark.
  • Serve warm. This Peach Cobbler recipe is exponentially better warmed!

how to make peach cobbler with CANNED PEaches

Yes, you can make Peach Cobbler with canned peaches.  They are super convenient and pantry friendly.  Naturally, fresh, ripe peaches will always be best, but sometimes peaches aren’t in season, you’re short on time, or your peaches aren’t ripe – that’s when canned peaches come to the rescue!  

They only hiccup you might run into is the bottom of the biscuit topping won’t be as cooked because the peaches won’t be hot when you add the topping.  This is because we have to skip the 15-minute peaches pre-bake because the peaches are already soft and will become mushy if baked any longer than needed.

To make Peach Cobbler with canned peaches, you will need four 29-ounce cans.  Here’s how to make it:

  • Drain the cans one at a time in a colander, stirring occasionally – but don’t rinse them or they will become water logged and make your cobbler a watery mess.  Thoroughly draining the peaches is the most important part of using canned peaches otherwise your filling will be runny.
  • Pat the peaches dry and transfer to the lightly greased 9×13 baking dish. 
  • Toss the peaches with all of the same ingredients as the original recipe but use melted butter instead of cubed.
  • Skip the 15-minute peaches pre-bake and proceed to top the peaches with the biscuit dough.
  • Bake per recipe instructions.

How to make peach cobbler with frozen peaches

Peach Cobbler is easy to make with frozen peaches.  Let the peaches thaw in a colander before making your cobbler, drain off excess juices, then pat dry.  Follow the original recipe, including the 15-minute peach pre-bake.  

peach cobbler RECIPE VARIATIONS:

My favorite easy Peach Cobbler is this classic recipe – but that doesn’t mean you can’t mix it up!  Here are some recipe variation ideas:  

  • Add berries.  Add 2 cups blueberries such as raspberries, blueberries or blackberries.   If using frozen berries, increase the cornstarch by 1 tablespoon.
  • Use other stone fruit.  You can add, mix and match peaches and nectarines or I’ve even used peacharines!
  • Add coconut.  Add add sweetened coconut to the filling.
  • Add nuts.  Add chopped pecans or walnuts to the peach filling.
  • Swap topping. Turn the Peach Cobbler into a Crisp by adding more of a streusel topping.  Follow the instructions for my Apple Crisp topping.
  • Make gluten-free Peach Cobbler.   Swap the flour in the topping with gluten free flour 1 to 1 baking flour like Bob Red’s Mill. All the rest of the ingredients are gluten free.
  • Make vegan Peach Cobbler.  Replace the butter with vegan butter.
top view of peach cobbler recipe with vanilla ice cream

HOW TO SERVE HOMEMADE peach cobbler

The BEST Peach Cobbler recipe is served warm, fresh from the oven.  It becomes exponentially more delicious with a big, cold scoop of vanilla ice cream.  The cold, silky smooth ice cream mingled with the warm, sweet, filling and buttery soft, crunchy topping is heavenly!   You can also top with extra berries, whipped cream or berry syrup – but honestly this Peach Cobbler doesn’t need it!

WHAT TO SERVE WITH EASY PEACH COBBLER

This easy Peach Cobbler is a favorite summer-time dessert so naturally, it pairs well with any of your favorite summer cookout foods such as Best Burgers, Steak Kabobs, Hawaiian Chicken Kabobs, Grilled Flank Steak, Grilled Sirloin Steak, Chili Lime Grilled Salmon and Grilled Lemon Butter Shrimp. 

CAN YOU MAKE peach cobbler AHEAD OF TIME?

Yes, you can prep most of the Peach Cobbler ahead of time, but you’ll want to keep the topping and the peach filling separate until ready to bake otherwise the topping will get soggy.   

TO PREP AHEAD:

  • Prepare filling according to recipe directions.  Transfer to lightly greased 9×13 pan, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to one day.
  • Prepare topping according to directions.  Cover and refrigerate.
  • When ready to bake, remove the topping from the refrigerator while you bake the peaches for 15 minutes per recipe instructions, then proceed to add the topping and bake.

HOW LONG IS peach cobbler RECIPE GOOD FOR?

Peach Cobbler is the very best fresh from the oven because the biscuit topping is the crunchiest.  Leftover are still fantastic, but the topping will start to soften a little.

HOW DO I STORE peach cobbler?

  • Peach Cobbler should be allowed to cool completely at room temperature. 
  • Once cool, cover tightly with plastic wrap or foil and refrigerate or transfer to an airtight container.
  • Refrigerated Peach Cobbler is good for 3-4 days.

HOW TO REHEAT peach cobbler

  • Microwave:  the microwave is convenient for smaller portions but the topping won’t get as crispy as the oven – just full disclosure – but still delish.  To microwave, transfer a portion to a microwave safe plate. Microwave for 30 second intervals until warmed through.   
  • Oven:  reheat the baking dish at 350 degrees F for 15-20 minutes or until heated though.  You can also transfer smaller portions to a smaller baking dish or cast-iron skillet to reheat.

CAN YOU FREEZE peach cobbler?

Yes!  Baked Peach Cobbler freezes very well but the topping does become softer and chewier and loses some of its crispiness – still totally delicious – just more cake-like.

How to freeze homemade Peach Cobbler:

  • Bake Peach Cobbler as directed.
  • Let it cool completely, then wrap it with a layer of plastic wrap followed by a layer of foil.  
  • Freeze for up to 6 months.
  • When ready to use, thaw overnight in the refrigerator.
  • Warm in the oven at 350 degrees F for 20 minutes or until heated through.

How to freeze Peach Cobbler filling:

I love to freeze a few cobblers worth of peaches during the summer so I can enjoy homemade Peach Cobbler with fresh peaches year-round.  This makes whipping up cobbler super quick and easy because all you have to do is thaw the peach filling and add the topping – the perfect answer for an easy dessert!  To freeze the filling:

  • Combine all of the peach filling ingredients: peaches, sugars, butter, cornstarch, lemon juice, lemon zest, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt in a gallon size Ziploc freezer bag. 
  • Squeeze out any excess air to prevent freezer burn then store in the freezer for up to 8 months.  
  • When you’re ready to bake the cobbler, thaw the peaches in the refrigerator overnight.
  • Pour the peaches and all liquid from the bag into the lightly greased baking pan and proceed with the recipe as written.

COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT PEACH COBBLER

What kind of peaches should I use for cobbler?

You can make Peach Cobbler all year round using fresh peaches during the summer months and canned or frozen peaches other times of the year. For fresh peaches, select ripe, yet somewhat firm yellow peaches (yellow cling or freestone variety). 

Can I use white peaches?

No, please use yellow peaches for this recipe. White peaches are too delicate and can bake up mushy and aren’t as flavorful as yellow peaches when baked.

How do you know when your peaches are ripe enough for cobbler?

When your peaches are ripe, fragrant and peel easily but are still somewhat firm, and not squishy or soft, then they are perfect for Peach Cobbler.

How do you slice your peaches?

When slicing the peaches, I prefer to slice them pretty thinly, about ¼-inch thick. This width is thin enough so that they become tender, lay on top of each evenly and get jammier, but thick enough that they don’t become mushy.

Why is my peach cobbler gummy?

You shouldn’t have a problem with Peach Cobbler being gummy if you use fresh fruit unless you overcook it.  Canned peaches, however, can result in a gummy filling because the peaches are already softer to begin with and bathed in heavy syrup.  Make sure to thoroughly drain the peaches before using.

Why is my peach cobbler runny?

There are a couple culprits to runny cobbler.  First, the peaches can be too ripe.  Make sure to use somewhat firm and not soft peaches.  If your peaches are extra ripe, add an extra tablespoon of cornstarch.   Second, make sure to leave a few spaces in between the topping so steam can escape.  Lastly, make sure the filling is bubbling-hot before removing it from the oven to ensure the cornstarch is cooked enough to thicken.

Is Peach Cobbler supposed to be gooey? 

Peach cobbler should be juicy and jammy, but not gooey – enveloped in a thick syrup that’s formed as the juices bake.  If your cobbler is gooey, it’s a sign that there was too much cornstarch mixed with the peaches for the amount of juices that were released while baking.  This is usually a result of your peaches not being ripe enough.

Why is the Peach Cobbler mushy?

If your Peach Cobbler is mushy, it means either 1) your peaches were too ripe and broke down too much when baking (this can also produce a mushy topping), or 2) the Peach Cobbler was overbaked.  Take care to use firm but ripe peaches and bake the cobbler until the topping reaches 200 degrees F.

How do you thicken peach cobbler?

You will need to toss the peaches with plenty of cornstarch before baking.  The cornstarch will thicken the juices so that your cobbler doesn’t come out runny. Make sure you see the filling vigorously bubbling up before pulling it out of the oven. This means the cornstarch is fully activated and has thickened the filling.

How do you thicken peach cobbler filling without cornstarch?

You may also thicken the Peach Cobbler filling with double the amount of flour.  This, however, is more likely to produce a gummy filling.

Can you overcook peach cobbler?

Yes, you don’t want to overbake Peach Cobbler or the peaches can become mushy. 

How long to bake Peach Cobbler? How do I know when it’s done?

It can be tricky to know when cobbler is done because you can’t see the filling or the bottom of the topping.  Bake the Peach Cobbler for 45-55 minutes at 350 degrees F.  When it’s done, the topping should be deeply golden and the peach juices should be bubbling up.  You can further tell when the cobbler is done by checking the temperature of the topping.  Cobbler topping is a variation on a quick bread, and should be baked to at least 200°F at the thickest part of the topping.  

Does peach cobbler need to be refrigerated?

Peach Cobbler does not need to be refrigerated for up to 2 days so it’s perfect to bring to you next potluck, picnic or barbecue.  Still, I like to refrigerate the cobbler in order to prolong its life.

Can I halve the recipe? 

Yes, you can certainly halve this recipe, although I would advise against it because it’s SO good and goes down SO easily.  My husband and I can eat half a pan in one sitting.  Still, if you want to half the recipe, use the serving arrows in the recipe card and change them to 4 servings.  Use an 8×8 baking dish. 

showing how to serve easy peach cobbler recipe by adding a scoop of vanilla ice cream
up close of scooping easy peach cobbler with fresh peaches

Peach Cobbler

Everyone need the best Peach Cobbler recipe in their easy baking repertoire, and this is it! Sweet peaches are laced with butter, cinnamon, nutmeg and a splash of vanilla and lemon juice then blanketed in a pillowy, crispy, sugar cinnamon topping that’s somewhere between a biscuit and a cake; crispy on the top and soft and fluffy underneath. Add some cold vanilla ice cream and dig into heaven. This homemade Peach Cobbler may look and taste impressive but it’s is one of the easiest, tastiest summer desserts of all time!  Plus, it can be prepped ahead of time (the filling and topping separate), for an easy stress-free dessert that will disappear in a flash!
Servings: 8 -10 servings

Ingredients

Peaches

  • 5 pounds ripe yet somewhat firm peeled peaches, about 14 medium peaches, cut into ¼-inch thick wedges
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup light brown sugar
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cubed small
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch (increase up to 4 TBS if peaches are very ripe/soft)
  • 2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Biscuit Topping

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 12 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cubed small
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk (see DIY in Notes)

Add Later

  • 1 tablespoon RAW or coarse sugar (may sub granulated sugar)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions

Cook peaches:

  • Preheat oven to 375°F. Spray a 9×13 baking dish with nonstick cooking spray.
  • Add all of the “Peach” ingredients (peaches through salt) to the baking dish. Toss to combine then spread into an even layer. Bake for 15 minutes (it will be very watery after 15 minutes but will thicken later). Meanwhile, prepare the topping.

Make topping while peaches bake:

  • Add the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt to a large food processor (or large bowl). Pulse (or whisk) until combined. Add the cubed butter and pulse several times until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs (the largest piece of butter should be no larger than pea-size). If not using a food processor, cut the butter into the dry ingredients with a pastry cutter.
  • Using a liquid measuring glass, whisk the vanilla into the buttermilk then pour into the feed tube. Pulse a few times to moisten (don’t overmix). If not using a food processor, make a well in the center of the mixture and add the buttermilk to the center. Fold together with a spatula until it begins to come together but don’t overwork the dough.

Add topping

  • Remove peaches from oven and immediately add the topping (the peaches need to be piping hot to cook the bottom of the topping). To add the topping, drop it by small spoonfuls all over the peaches, leaving a few gaps so the filling can steam. Sprinkle the topping with raw sugar and ground cinnamon.

Bake

  • Bake in middle of oven at 375°F for 45-55 minutes, until the filling is thick and bubbling and the topping is golden.

Notes

  • Peaches: choose ripe, fresh, somewhat firm yellow peaches for the best tasting Peach Cobbler.  Take care, that the peaches aren’t too  They should be fragrant and peel easily but not squishy or you’ll end up with mushy cobbler. If your peaches are extra ripe/soft, consider adding an extra 1/2-1 tablespoon cornstarch.
  • Frozen peaches: thaw the peaches in a colander, drain off excess juices, then pat dry.  Follow the original recipe, including the 15-minute peach pre-bake.
  • DIY buttermilk: add 1 tablespoon lemon juice or white vinegar to a liquid measuring cup, then add milk until it reaches ¾ cup. Give it a stir then let rest for 10 minutes.
  • Sugar: I use raw sugar/coarse sugar because it has larger, coarser granules and a hint of molasses for superior crunch, sparkle and flavor, but you may substitute with granulated sugar.
  • Add the topping to piping hot peaches.  Make sure the peaches are piping hot before adding the topping, otherwise the bottom of the cobbler doesn’t cook. To achieve this, begin making the topping as soon as the peaches go into the oven, or you can even make it first and refrigerate. 
  • Don’t overwork the biscuit dough.  Don’t overmix, over-pulse or over-handle the dough.  Overworking the dough will melt the butter and over-activate the gluten in the flour, resulting in a hard, flat topping. It’s okay if the dough is a little crumbly.
  • Use all of the topping. If you have extra dough after you have added the topping, double it up in some of the thinner areas until all of it is used.
  • Prevent burnt topping.  I never have the problem of a burnt topping –but if it’s your first time making this Peach Cobbler recipe, keep an eye on it to be safe.  If the topping starts to brown too quickly, then lay a piece of foil over the top and bake on.
  • Watch for a bubbling filling.  It’s important to bake the Peach Cobbler until the topping is deeply golden and you see syrup bubbling up all around the edges of the pan.  This is a sign the filling has thickened in the middle.  If you skip this sign, then the filling will be runny beneath the cobbler.  If this happens to you, pop the cobbler back in the oven and cover with foil if the topping is becoming too dark.

Make ahead

  • Prepare filling according to recipe directions.  Transfer to lightly greased 9×13 pan, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to one day.
  • Prepare topping according to directions.  Cover and refrigerate.
  • When ready to bake, remove the topping from the refrigerator while you bake the peaches for 15 minutes per recipe instructions, then proceed to add the topping and bake.

HOW TO Store and reheat

  • To store: let cobbler cool completely before tightly covering and storing in the refrigerator for 3-4 days.
  • To freeze:  let the Peach Cobbler cool completely, then wrap it with a layer of plastic wrap followed by a layer of foil.  Freeze for up to 6 months. When ready to use, thaw overnight in the refrigerator.  Warm in the oven at 350 degrees F for 20 minutes or until heated through.
  • To freeze filling: you can also freeze just the filling when fresh peaches are in season for an easy dessert all year long. Combine all of the peach filling ingredients in a gallon size Ziploc freezer bag, squeeze out any excess air and freeze for up to 8 months.  When you’re ready to bake, thaw the peaches in the refrigerator overnight. Pour the peaches and all liquid from the bag into the lightly greased baking pan and proceed with the recipe as written.
  • To reheat in the microwave:  the microwave is convenient for smaller portions but the topping won’t get as crispy as the oven – just full disclosure – but still delish.  To microwave, transfer a portion to a microwave safe plate. Microwave for 30 second intervals until warmed through.   
  • To reheat in the oven:  reheat the baking dish at 350 degrees F for 15-20 minutes or until heated though.  You can also transfer smaller portions to a smaller baking dish or cast-iron skillet to reheat.v

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2 Comments

  1. Ramya says

    Will be making this soon will be using vegan butter for the peaches and biscuit topping can i use vegan buttermilk as am a vegan i never had peach cobbler before perfect for my after office snacks sorry i took a break from commenting on your recipes as busy with work will dm you if i make this and let you know how it goes Thanks Ramya

    • Jen says

      Thanks Ramya, I’m so pleased you can make it vegan. I’m excited to introduce you to peach cobbler!